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KEVIN B TERRACIANO

PROFESSOR

Office: 5353 BUNCHE
Phone: 310-825-8410
Fax: 310-206-9630
E-mail: terra@history.ucla.edu

Mailing Address:

UCLA Department of History
6265 Bunche Hall
Box 951473
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1473

Class Websites

Field

Latin America

Research Interests

Colonial Latin American history, especially Mexico and the indigenous cultures and languages of central and southern Mexico.

Notes

Kevin Terraciano is Professor of History, acting director of the Latin American Institute at UCLA, and President of the American Society for Ethnohistory. He specializes in Colonial Latin American history, especially Mexico and the indigenous cultures and languages of central and southern Mexico. The following pages and links outline his past and present research projects and teaching.

Terraciano chaired the program committee of the annual meeting of the American Society for Ethnohistory in Los Angeles on October 19-22, 2011. For information on the society, go to: http://ethnohistory.org

Terraciano has contributed to the planning of an exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art titled Contested Visions of the Spanish Colonial World. He wrote a chapter in the exhibit catalog, edited by Ilona Katzew (Yale University Press, 2011).

Chapter: "Competing Visions of the Conquest of Mexico.”

Terraciano is participating in a symposium at UCLA and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art on the exhibit.

Link to Contested Visions Symposium

Terraciano is on sabbatical leave, with the support of a National Endowment of the Humanities fellowship, until the fall of 2012. He is writing a book on the Conquest of Mexico, completing a translation and analysis of the Nahuatl-language Codex Sierra, and collaborating with linguists and historians to translate and analyze colonial-era Zapotec-language texts from the Valley of Oaxaca...among other things.

Link to Codex Sierra Abstract

Link to Casa de la Cacica Abstract

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

“Competing Memories of the Conquest of Mexico.” In Contested Visions in the Spanish Colonial World. Ed. by Ilona Katzew. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011.

“Voices from the Other Side: Native Views from New Spain, Peru, and North America.” In The Atlantic World c.1450-c.1850, ed. by Philip Morgan and Nicholas Canny. London and New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.

“History: Ethnohistory: Mesoamerica.” Co-edited with Lisa Sousa. Handbook of Latin American Studies, vol. 66. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2011.

“A Historiography of New Spain.” Co-authored with Lisa Sousa. In The Historiography of Latin America, ed. by Jose Moya. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010.

“Three Texts in One: Book XII of the Florentine Codex.” Ethnohistory, vol. 57 (1) 2010.

“La genealogía de la memoria social indígena: Las construcciones estratégicas del pasado en los títulos primordiales del valle de Oaxaca.” Co-authored with Lisa Sousa, in Andrew Roth Seneff (ed.), Caras y máscaras del México étnico: La participación indígena en las formaciones del Estado mexicano, vol. I. Zamora, México: El Colegio de Michoacán, 2010.

“Three Views of the Conquest of Mexico from the Other Mexica.” In The Conquest of Mexico All Over Again, ed. by Susan Schroeder. London: Sussex Academic Press, 2010.

"Los mercaderes en la Mixteca Alta durante la época colonial." In Bases de la complejidad social en Oaxaca, ed. by Nelly Robles. Mexico: Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, 2009.

“La escritura alfabética en lengua mixteca de la época colonial.” In Memorias del coloquio Francisco Belmar: Conferencias sobre lenguas Otomangues y Oaxaqueñas, ed. by Ausencia López Cruz and Michael Swanton, vol. 2. Oaxaca: Biblioteca Francisco de Burgoa; Instituto Nacional de Lenguas Indígenas; Universidad Autónoma “Benito Juárez” de Oaxaca; Colegio Superior para la Educación Integral Intercultural de Oaxaca; Fundación Alfredo Harp Helú, 2008.

“Indigenous Peoples in Colonial Spanish American Society.” In The Blackwell Companion to Latin American History, edited by Thomas H. Holloway. Blackwell Publishers, 2008.

“The People of Two Hearts and the One God from Castile: Ambivalent Responses to Christianity in Early Colonial Oaxaca.” In Religion in New Spain: Varieties of Colonial Religious Experience, edited by Susan Schroeder and Stafford Poole. University of New Mexico Press, 2007.

Mesoamerican Voices: Native-Language Writings from Colonial Mexico, Oaxaca, Yucatan, and Guatemala, edited and translated with Lisa Sousa and Matthew Restall. Cambridge University Press, 2005.

"Reading Women into Mixtec Writings." In Essays in Honor of Mary Elizabeth Smith, edited by Elizabeth Boone. Tulane University Press, 2005.


FORTHCOMING PUBLICATIONS

“Connecting Nahua and Mixtec Histories.” In Essays in Honor of Henry B. Nicholson, ed. by Matthew Boxt. Boulder: University of Colorado Press, forthcoming in 2011.

“Colonial Mesoamerica.” Oxford Online Bibliographies, forthcoming in 2012.

La casa de la cacica de Teposcolula, Oaxaca. Book manuscript co-authored with Sebastián van Doesburg, María de los Angeles Romero Frizzi, and Ronald Spores. Mexico: Editorial Porrua; Fundación Alfredo Harp Helú, forthcoming in 2012.

“Un testamento zapoteco del Valle de Oaxaca, 1614.” Co-authored with Pamela Munro et al. In special issue of Acervos: Boletín de las Bibliotecas y los Archivos de Oaxaca on the translation of indigenous languages, forthcoming in 2012.

“Una confesión de homicidio en la Mixteca Alta, 1684.” In special issue of Acervos: Boletín de las Bibliotecas y los Archivos de Oaxaca on the translation of indigenous languages, forthcoming in 2012.

Los mixtecos de Oaxaca después de la conquista. Translation of The Mixtecs of Colonial Oaxaca. Mexico: Fondo de Cultura Económica, forthcoming in 2012.

“Testament of a Mixtec (Ñudzahui) Woman, Lucía Hernández Ñuquihui.” In Dead Giveaways II: Testaments from Colonial Latin America, ed. by Jonathan Truitt and Mark Christensen. Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, forthcoming in 2012.

“The Zapotec-Language Testament of Sebastiana de Mendoza, c.1675.” Co-authored with Pamela Munro et al. In Dead Giveaways II: Testaments from Colonial Latin America, ed. by Jonathan Truitt and Mark Christensen. Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, forthcoming in 2012.

TEACHING
Terraciano teaches various lecture courses and seminars at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Since 2001, he has won eight separate teaching awards. In 2001, he won the UCLA Distinguished Teaching Award and the Eby Award for the Art of Teaching. In 2002 and 2007, he was awarded the UCLA Academic Advancement Program Faculty Recognition Award for his work with students from underrepresented or disadvantaged backgrounds. For five years in a row between 2006 and 2010 he received the Excellence in Graduate Mentoring Award for his work with UCLA doctoral students.

Terraciano is advising several doctoral students in early Latin American history. He also serves on numerous doctoral committees in related fields of History (modern Latin America, colonial United States, early modern Europe, Africa) and in other departments, including: Anthropology, Art History, Ethnomusicology, Linguistics, Sociology, and Spanish Literature. In addition to formal teaching duties, he leads informal seminars on Classical Nahuatl and early modern Spanish paleography for graduate students in the colonial field.


undergraduate and graduate teaching profile


SERVICE
Finally, Terraciano continues to serve the university, profession, and Los Angeles community in numerous ways.

selected service

Selected Publications

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

“Competing Memories of the Conquest of Mexico.” In Contested Visions in the Spanish Colonial World. Ed. by Ilona Katzew. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011.

“Voices from the Other Side: Native Views from New Spain, Peru, and North America.” In The Atlantic World c.1450-c.1850, ed. by Philip Morgan and Nicholas Canny. London and New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.

“History: Ethnohistory: Mesoamerica.” Co-edited with Lisa Sousa. Handbook of Latin American Studies, vol. 66. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2011.

“A Historiography of New Spain.” Co-authored with Lisa Sousa. In The Historiography of Latin America, ed. by Jose Moya. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010.

“Three Texts in One: Book XII of the Florentine Codex.” Ethnohistory, vol. 57 (1) 2010.

“La genealogía de la memoria social indígena: Las construcciones estratégicas del pasado en los títulos primordiales del valle de Oaxaca.” Co-authored with Lisa Sousa, in Andrew Roth Seneff (ed.), Caras y máscaras del México étnico: La participación indígena en las formaciones del Estado mexicano, vol. I. Zamora, México: El Colegio de Michoacán, 2010.

“Three Views of the Conquest of Mexico from the Other Mexica.” In The Conquest of Mexico All Over Again, ed. by Susan Schroeder. London: Sussex Academic Press, 2010.

"Los mercaderes en la Mixteca Alta durante la época colonial." In Bases de la complejidad social en Oaxaca, ed. by Nelly Robles. Mexico: Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, 2009.

“La escritura alfabética en lengua mixteca de la época colonial.” In Memorias del coloquio Francisco Belmar: Conferencias sobre lenguas Otomangues y Oaxaqueñas, ed. by Ausencia López Cruz and Michael Swanton, vol. 2. Oaxaca: Biblioteca Francisco de Burgoa; Instituto Nacional de Lenguas Indígenas; Universidad Autónoma “Benito Juárez” de Oaxaca; Colegio Superior para la Educación Integral Intercultural de Oaxaca; Fundación Alfredo Harp Helú, 2008.

“Indigenous Peoples in Colonial Spanish American Society.” In The Blackwell Companion to Latin American History, edited by Thomas H. Holloway. Blackwell Publishers, 2008.

“The People of Two Hearts and the One God from Castile: Ambivalent Responses to Christianity in Early Colonial Oaxaca.” In Religion in New Spain: Varieties of Colonial Religious Experience, edited by Susan Schroeder and Stafford Poole. University of New Mexico Press, 2007.

Mesoamerican Voices: Native-Language Writings from Colonial Mexico, Oaxaca, Yucatan, and Guatemala, edited and translated with Lisa Sousa and Matthew Restall. Cambridge University Press, 2005.

"Reading Women into Mixtec Writings." In Essays in Honor of Mary Elizabeth Smith, edited by Elizabeth Boone. Tulane University Press, 2005.


FORTHCOMING PUBLICATIONS

“Connecting Nahua and Mixtec Histories.” In Essays in Honor of Henry B. Nicholson, ed. by Matthew Boxt. Boulder: University of Colorado Press, forthcoming in 2011.

“Colonial Mesoamerica.” Oxford Online Bibliographies, forthcoming in 2012.

La casa de la cacica de Teposcolula, Oaxaca. Book manuscript co-authored with Sebastián van Doesburg, María de los Angeles Romero Frizzi, and Ronald Spores. Mexico: Editorial Porrua; Fundación Alfredo Harp Helú, forthcoming in 2012.

“Un testamento zapoteco del Valle de Oaxaca, 1614.” Co-authored with Pamela Munro et al. In special issue of Acervos: Boletín de las Bibliotecas y los Archivos de Oaxaca on the translation of indigenous languages, forthcoming in 2012.

“Una confesión de homicidio en la Mixteca Alta, 1684.” In special issue of Acervos: Boletín de las Bibliotecas y los Archivos de Oaxaca on the translation of indigenous languages, forthcoming in 2012.

Los mixtecos de Oaxaca después de la conquista. Translation of The Mixtecs of Colonial Oaxaca. Mexico: Fondo de Cultura Económica, forthcoming in 2012.

“Testament of a Mixtec (Ñudzahui) Woman, Lucía Hernández Ñuquihui.” In Dead Giveaways II: Testaments from Colonial Latin America, ed. by Jonathan Truitt and Mark Christensen. Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, forthcoming in 2012.

“The Zapotec-Language Testament of Sebastiana de Mendoza, c.1675.” Co-authored with Pamela Munro et al. In Dead Giveaways II: Testaments from Colonial Latin America, ed. by Jonathan Truitt and Mark Christensen. Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, forthcoming in 2012.

Awards

PRIZES FOR BOOKS AND ARTICLES

Terraciano's first book, The Mixtecs of Colonial Oaxaca (Stanford University Press, 2001), received the Wheeler-Voegelin Award from the American Society for Ethnohistory for the best book published in the field of ethnohistory in 2001, the Cline Prize from the Conference on Latin American History for the best book on the Indians of Latin America published in 2001 and 2002, and the Bolton-Johnson Prize (honorable mention) from the Conference on Latin American History (American Historical Association) for the best book on the history of Latin America published in 2001. El Fondo de Cultura Económica will publish the book in Spanish in 2012.

book abstract: The Mixtecs of Colonial Oaxaca

Three of Terraciano’s research articles have won awards in recent years. He received the Heizer Prize from the American Society for Ethnohistory for an article titled "Crime and Culture in Colonial Mexico: the Case of the Mixtec Murder Note" (Ethnohistory 45:4, 1998). Another article, titled "The Colonial Mixtec Community," published in the Hispanic American Historical Review (80:1, 2000), won the Robertson prize from the Conference on Latin American History. In 2004, Terraciano and Lisa Sousa received the Heizer Prize from the American Society for Ethnohistory for an article titled "The 'Original Conquest' of Oaxaca: Late Colonial Nahuatl and Mixtec Accounts of the Spanish Conquest” (Ethnohistory, 50:2, Spring 2003).


PRESENTATIONS

Terraciano continues to present papers and give talks in local, national, and international settings to academic and public audiences.


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