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Reading List

 

Reading Lists

Reading List for General Field in History of Science, 2008-9

(Written Exams for June 2009)

(List is categorized roughly by period and century)

The written exams will test knowledge of the history of science, technology and medicine from the ancient to the modern and contemporary periods. This is a kind of master list, for the purposes of the exams, but is not of course complete in its coverage of all topics, disciplines, geographical regions or time periods. Books, and in some cases articles, were chosen to represent the range of methods, approaches and styles of writing the history of science, technology and medicine. These books give an overview of the field, broadly construed, but do not represent a canon, and should lead students to other readings as well. (The list is weighted toward recent scholarship, with some examples of classic works included as well.)

 

Collections and books spanning long periods (difficult to classify chronologically)

• Bonner, Thomas N., Becoming a Physician: Medical Education in Great Britain,
France, Germany and the United State 1750-1945
, Oxford UP, 1995
• Bourguet, Marie-Noelle, Christian Licoppe and Otto Sibum (eds.), Instruments, Travel, and Science: Itineraries of precision from the seventeenth to the twentieth century (Routledge, 2002)
• Bowker, Geoffrey C., Memory Practices in the Sciences. MIT Press, 2008
• Bray, Francesca, Technology and Gender: Fabrics of Power in Late Imperial China (California, 1997)
• Brooke, John Hedley, Margaret J. Osler, and Jitse M. van der Meer, eds, Science in Theistic Contexts, Osiris, vol. 16 (2001), (essays by Brooke, Wystra, Ragep, Barker & Goldstein, Finocchiaro, Cook, Osler, Snobelen)
• Daston, Lorraine and Katharine Park, Wonders and the Order of Nature (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1998)
• Daston, Lorraine and Peter Galison, Objectivity (Brooklyn, NY: Zone Books 2007)
• Elman, Benjamin, A Cultural History of Modern Science in Late Imperial China (Harvard, 2006)
• Fukagawa, Hidetoshi & Tony Rothman, Sacred Mathematics: Japanese Temple Geometry (Princeton, 2008)
• Hanson, Marta, Robust Northerners, Delicate Southerners: A Cultural History of Regionalism in Late Imperial Chinese Medicine
• Jardine, N., J.A. Secord, and E.C. Spary, Cultures of Natural History (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996)
• Low, Morris, Building a Modern Japan: Science, Technology, and Medicine in the Meiji Era and Beyond (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005)
• Raj, Kapil, Relocating Modern Science: Circulation and the Construction of Knowledge in South Asia and Europe, 1650-1900 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007)
• Risse, Guenter, Mending Bodies, Saving Souls: A History of Hospitals Oxford UP, 1999
• Rosenberg, Charles and Janet Golden, eds., Framing Disease: Studiesin Cultural History (Rutgers UP, 1992)
• Schiebinger, Londa and Claudia Swan (eds.), Colonial Botany: Science, Commerce and Politics in the Early Modern World (U Penn Press, 2005)
• Temkin, Owsei, The Double Face of Janus Johns Hopkins UP, 1977 (new paperback ed. 2006)
• Wise, M. Norton, ed., The Values of Precision (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995)

 

Antiquity to 1600

• Alexander, Amir, Geometrical Landscapes: The Voyages of Discovery and the Transformation of Mathematical Practice (Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 2002)
• Harkness, Deborah. The Jewel House: Elizabethan London and the scientific Revolution (Yale University Press, 2006)
• Lehoux, Daryn, “Observation and prediction in ancient astrology,” Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 2004: 227-246
• Netz, Reviel, The Shaping of Deduction in Greek Mathematics: A Study in Cognitive History (Cambridge University Press, 1999)
• Park, Katharine. Secrets of women : gender, generation, and the origins of human dissection (MIT Press, 2006)
• von Staden, Heinrich, Herophilus: The Art of Medicine in Early Alexandria (Cambridge UP, 1989)
• Westman, Robert, “The Astronomer’s Role in the 16th Century,” History of Science 18 (1980): 105-147.

 

17th Century

• Biagioli, Mario, Galileo’s Instruments of Credit: Telescopes, Images, Secrecy (Chicago UP, 2007)
• Burtt, E.A., The Metaphysical Foundations of Modern Science (Atlantic Highlands, NJ: Humanities Press, 1980) (reprint)
• Canizares-Esquerra, Jorge, Nature, Empire and Nation: Explorations of the History of Science in the Iberian World (Stanford, 2006)
• Cohen, I. Bernard and George E. Smith, ed. The Cambridge Companion to Newton (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002)
• Cook, Harold, Matters of Exchange: Commerce, Medicine and Science in the Dutch Golden Age (Yale, 2006)
• Cullen, Christopher, “The science/technology interface in seventeenth-century China: Song Yingxing on qi and the wu xing”. Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies 53 (1990): 295-318.
• Dobbs, B.J.T., The Janus Face of Genius: The Role of Alchemy in Newton's Thought (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991)
• Gaukroger, Stephen, Descartes: An Intellectual Biography (Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1995)
• Jones, Matthew L. The Good Life in the Scientific Revolution: Descartes, Pascal, Leibniz, and the Cultivation of Virtue. University of Chicago Press, 2006.
Koyré, Alexandre, Metaphysics and Measurement (Harvard UP, 1968)
• Lindberg, David C. and Robert S. Westman, eds. Reappraisals of the Scientific Revolution (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990)

• Newman, William, Atoms and Alchemy: Chymistry and the Experimental Origins of the Scientific Revolution (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006)
• Osler, Margaret J., ed. Rethinking the Scientific Revolution (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000)
• Redondi, Pietro, Galileo Heretic (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1987)
• Shapin, Steven and Simon Schaffer, Leviathan and the Air Pump (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1985)
• Smith, Pamela, The Body of the Artisan: Art and Experience in the Scientific Revolution (Chicago, 2004)

 

18th Century

• Alder, Ken, Engineering the Revolution (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1997)
• Alder, Ken, The Measure of All Things (New York: Free Press, 2002)
• Clark, William, Jan Golinski, and Simon Schaffer, eds. The Sciences in Enlightened Europe (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999)
• Jacob, Margaret, Scientific Culture and the Making of the Industrial West (New York: Oxford University Press, 1997)
• Koerner, Lisbet, Linnaeus: Nature and Nation (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1999)
• Schiebinger, Londa, The Mind has No Sex?. Women in the Origins of Modern Science (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1989)
• Terrall, Mary, The Man who Flattened the Earth. Maupertuis and the Sciences in the Enlightenment (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002)
• Weiner, Dora, The Citizen-Patient in Revolutionary and Imperial Paris (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993)

 

19th Century

• Appel, Toby A., The Cuvier-Geoffroy Debate: French Biology in the Decades before Darwin (New York: Oxford University Press, 1987)
• Berg, Maxine, The Machinery Question and the Making of Political Economy, 1815-1848 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1980)
• Brose, Eric Dorn, The Politics of Technological Change in Prussia: Out of the Shadow of Antiquity, 1809-1848 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1993)
• Browne, Janet, Charles Darwin: a Biography, 2 vols (New York: Knopf, 1995 & 2002)
• Cahan, David (ed.), Hermann von Helmholtz and the Foundations of Nineteenth Century Science (Berkeley: UC Press, 1993)
• Carson, John, The Measure of Merit: Talents, Intelligence, and Inequality in the French and American Republics, 1750-1940 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2007)
• Cunningham, Andrew and Perry Williams (eds), The Laboratory Revolution in Medicine, Cambridge University, 1992
• Foucault, Michel, Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison (New York: Pantheon, 1977)
• Foucault, Michel, The Birth of the Clinic, New York: Vintage Books, 1973, 1994
• Gillispie, Charles, “The Encyclopédie and Jacobin Philosophy of Science: A Study of Ideas and Consequences,” in Critical Problems in the History of Science, Marshall Clagett, ed., (University of Wisconsin Press, 1959), 255-290
• Hughes, Thomas, American Genesis: A Century of Invention and Technological Enthusiasm (New York: Viking, 1989)
• Johnston, William, The Modern Epidemic: A History of Tuberculosis in Japan (Harvard, 1995)
• Maas, Harro, William Stanley Jevons and the Making of Modern Economics (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005)
• Porter, Theodore M., Karl Pearson: The Scientific Life in a Statistical Age (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2004)
• Secord, James, Victorian Sensation: The Extraordinary Publication, Reception, and Secret Authorship of Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000)
• Smith, Crosbie, and M. Norton Wise, Energy and Empire (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1989)
• Warner, John Harley, The Therapeutic Perspective: Medical Knowledge and Identity in America, 1820-1855 (Harvard University Press, 1986)
• Warwick, Andrew, Masters of Theory: Cambridge and the Rise of Mathematical Physics (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003)

 

20th Century and beyond

• Bartholomew, James, The Formation of Science in Japan (Yale, 1989)
• Joel Braslow, Mental Ills and Bodily Cures: Psychiatric Treatment in the First Half of the Twentieth Century (University of California Press, 1997)

• Cassidy, David C., Uncertainty: The Life and Science of Werner Heisenberg (New York: Freeman, 1992)
• Coen, Deborah, Vienna in the Age of Uncertainty: Science, Liberalism, and Private Life (Chicago, 2007)
• de Chadarevian, Soraya, Designs for Life: Molecular Biology after World War II (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002)
• Edgerton, David, The Shock of the Old: Technology and Global History since 1900 (Profile Books, 2006)
• Fleck, Ludwik, Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1979)
• Franklin, Sarah. Dolly Mixtures: The Remaking of Genealogy. Duke University Press, 2007.
• Galison, Peter, Einstein's Clocks, Poincaré's Maps: Empires of Time (New York: Norton, 2003)
• Graham, Loren, Science in Russia and the Soviet Union (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)
• Hevly, Bruce and Peter Galison, Big Science: the growth of large-scale research (Stanford Stanford University Press, 1992)
• Kay, Lily, Who Wrote the Book of Life? A History of the Genetic Code (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2000)
• Kelty, Christopher M., Two Bits: The Cultural Significance of Free Software. Duke University Press, 2008.
• Kohler, Robert E., Lords of the Fly: Drosophila Genetics and the Experimental Life (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994)
• Landecker, Hannah, Culturing Life: How Cells Became Technologies. Harvard University Press, 2007
• Leslie, Stuart, The Cold War and American science : the military-industrial-academic complex at MIT and Stanford (New York : Columbia University Press, 1993).
• Lock, Margaret, and Edward Norbeck, eds., Health, Illness, and Medical Care in Japan: Cultural and Social Dimensions (Hawaii, 1987)
• MacKenzie, Donald. An Engine, Not a Camera: How Financial Models Shape Markets MIT Press, 2008.
• Mitman, Gregg. Breathing Space: How Allergies Shape Our Lives and Landscapes Yale University Press, 2007.
• Murphy, Michelle, Sick Building Syndrome and the Problem of Uncertainty: Environmental Politics, Technoscience, and Women Workers. Duke University Press, 2006.
• Najita, Tetsuo "On Culture and Technology in Postmodern Japan," Postmodernism and Japan, eds. Masao Miyoshi & H. D. Harootunian (Duke, 1989).
• Porter, Theodore M., Trust in Numbers: The Pursuit of Objectivity in Science and Public Life (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995)
• Renneberg, Monica and Mark Walker, Science, Technology, and National Socialism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)
• Rheinberger, Hans-Jorg, Toward a History of Epistemic Things: Synthesizing Proteins in the Test Tube (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1997)
• Shapin, Steven, The Scientific Life: A Moral History of a Late Modern Vocation. University of Chicago Press, 2008
• Song Sang-Yong, “Science, Technology and Society Studies in Korea: Background and Prospects,” Science Technology & Society (1999), pp. 107-114.
• Thompson, Charis, Making Parents: The Ontological Choreography of Reproductive Technologies. MIT Press, 2007
• Thompson, Emily, The Soundscape of Modernity: Architectural Acoustics and the Culture of Listening in America (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2002)
• Traweek, Sharon, Beamtimes and Lifetimes: The World of High-Energy Physicists (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1988)
• Weart, Spencer, Nuclear Fear: A History of Images (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1988)


Philosophy/Theory (not period-specific)

• Collins, Harry, Changing Order: Replication and Induction in Scientific Practice, (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1985)
• Golinski, Jan, Making Natural Knowledge: Constructivism and the History of Science (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998)
• Gooding, David, Trevor Pinch and Simon Schaffer (eds), The Uses of Experiments, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989)
• Hacking, Ian, Representing and Intervening: Introductory Topics in the Philosophy of Natural Science (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1983)
• Kitcher, Philip, The Advancement of Science: Science Without Legend, Objectivity Without Illusions (Oxford : Oxford University Press, 1993)
• Kuhn, Thomas S., The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992)
• Latour, Bruno, Science in Action (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1987)
• Pickering, Andrew (ed), Science as Practice and Culture, (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 1992)


 

Themes and Trends in History of Science, Technology and Medicine

These are some ways of organizing the reading list according to themes and questions rather than chronology. These lists are not meant to be complete, or even close to complete, bibliographies on these themes. They are intended simply to suggest some possible avenues into the chronological list. As students prepare this part of the written exams, they may want to generate their own thematic clusters of readings as well.

 

Redefining Scientific Rationality

In 1945 broad agreement existed about what constituted science, who did it and why. By the year 2000 in the early modern historiography of European and American science little remained of that original definition of what constituted science and scientific rationality. The books designated here are but the high points in an historiographical transformation that restructured the contours of early modern practices and beliefs concerning the natural world. By far the most dramatic alteration of our understanding centered on the reintegration of alchemy into the life work of figures as canonical as Newton and Boyle.


• Kuhn, Thomas S., The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1962, reprint 1992)
• Frances Yates, Giordano Bruno and the Hermetic Tradition (London, 1964) Not on the main list but central to the transformation in rethinking the boundaries of science and magic.
• Dobbs, B.J.T., The Janus Face of Genius: The Role of Alchemy in Newton's Thought (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991)
• Osler, Margaret J., ed. Rethinking the Scientific Revolution (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000)
• Newman, William, Atoms and Alchemy: Chymistry and the Experimental Origins of the Scientific Revolution (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006)
• Alexander, Amir, Geometrical Landscapes: The Voyages of Discovery and the Transformation of Mathematical Practice (Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 2002)
• Smith, Pamela, The Body of the Artisan: Art and Experience in the Scientific Revolution (Chicago, 2004)
• Harkness, Deborah. The Jewel House: Elizabethan London and the scientific Revolution (Yale University Press, 2006)

 

The Role of Science and Technology in Knowledge Economies

Spurred by the research of historians of science and technology, beginning with the pioneering work of Musson and Robinson [Science and the Industrial Revolution, 1969], economic historians have become increasingly receptive to the notion that scientific knowledge with an applied focus worked in industrial settings from the 1770s onward. This was most evident first in Great Britain but can also be seen at work in 19th –century American and Continental industrial settings. Although still resisted by a few economic historians, the notion of a knowledge economy where science and technology are coherently linked will undoubtedly remain a fertile area for present and future research.


• Alder, Ken, Engineering the Revolution (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1997)
• Bourguet, Marie-Noelle, Christian Licoppe and Otto Sibum (eds.), Instruments, Travel, and Science:itineraries of precision from the seventeenth to the twentieth century (Routledge, 2002)
• de Chadarevian, Soraya, Designs for Life: Molecular Biology after World War II (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002)
• Edgerton, David, The Shock of the Old: Technology and Global History since 1900 (Profile Books, 2006)
• Graham, Loren, Science in Russia and the Soviet Union (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)
• Harkness, Deborah. The Jewel House: Elizabethan London and the scientific Revolution (Yale University Press, 2006)
• Hughes, Thomas, American Genesis: A Century of Invention and Technological Enthusiasm (New York: Viking, 1989)
• Jacob, Margaret, Scientific Culture and the Making of the Industrial West (1997)
• Low, Morris, Building a Modern Japan: Science, Technology, and Medicine in the Meiji Era and Beyond (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005)
• Raj, Kapil, Relocating Modern Science: Circulation and the Construction of Knowledge in South Asia and Europe, 1650-1900 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007)
• Smith, Crosbie, and M. Norton Wise, Energy and Empire (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1989)
• Thompson, Emily, The Soundscape of Modernity: Architectural Acoustics and the Culture of Listening in America (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2002)

 

 

Science, Technology, and Medicine and Political Order

Max Weber identified the process of rationalization with science and bureaucracy, and indeed science has since the early modern period been frequently allied with administration. It also has provided a more explicit form of public expertise and a systematic basis for pursuing new or improved technologies. State support for science, though not always specifically targeted, has recognized these virtues, and association with states has (often) nudged science toward neutral objectivity and a more apolitical stance. And yet in another sense the rationalizing projects of science have sometimes been profoundly political. The knowledge practices of the “scientific community” have at times been taken as a model of citizenship.



• Latour, Bruno, Science in Action (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1987)
• Elman, Benjamin, A Cultural History of Modern Science in Late Imperial China (Harvard, 2006)
• Low, Morris, Building a Modern Japan: Science, Technology, and Medicine in the Meiji Era and Beyond (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005)
• Raj, Kapil, Relocating Modern Science: Circulation and the Construction of Knowledge in South Asia and Europe, 1650-1900 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007)
• Shapin, Steven and Simon Schaffer, Leviathan and the Air Pump (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1985)
• Alder, Ken, Engineering the Revolution (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1997)
• Alder, Ken, The Measure of All Things (New York: Free Press, 2002)
• Koerner, Lisbet, Linnaeus: Nature and Nation (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1999)
• Weiner, Dora, The Citizen-Patient in Revolutionary and Imperial Paris (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993)
• Carson, John, The Measure of Merit: Talents, Intelligence, and Inequality in the French and American Republics, 1750-1940 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2007)
• Foucault, Michel, Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison (New York: Pantheon, 1977)
• Hughes, Thomas, American Genesis: A Century of Invention and Technological Enthusiasm (New York: Viking, 1989)
• Porter, Theodore M., Trust in Numbers: The Pursuit of Objectivity in Science and Public Life (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995)
• Porter, Theodore M., Karl Pearson: The Scientific Life in a Statistical Age (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2004)
• Smith, Crosbie, and M. Norton Wise, Energy and Empire (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1989)
• Wise, M. Norton, ed., The Values of Precision (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995)
• Renneberg, Monica and Mark Walker, Science, Technology, and National Socialism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)
• de Chadarevian, Soraya, Designs for Life: Molecular Biology after World War II (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002)
• Graham, Loren, Science in Russia and the Soviet Union (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)
• Graham, Loren, Science in Russia and the Soviet Union (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)

 

Gender and History of STM

This is neither a complete list of works drawing on the very extensive and fruitful trend to pay attention to gender in history of science, technology and medicine. It is simply a compilation of the books on the reading list that deal in some manner with gender. For more extensive bibliography on women in STM, which has some overlap with this list, see supplementary bibliography “History of Women in Histories of Science, Technology, and Medicine

• Bray, Francesca, Technology and Gender: Fabrics of Power in Late Imperial China (California, 1997)
• Schiebinger, Londa and Claudia Swan (eds.), Colonial Botany: Science, Commerce and Politics in the Early Modern World (U Penn Press, 2005)
• Harkness, Deborah. The Jewel House: Elizabethan London and the scientific Revolution (Yale University Press, 2006)
• Park, Katharine. Secrets of women : gender, generation, and the origins of human dissection (MIT Press, 2006)
• Clark, William, Jan Golinski, and Simon Schaffer, eds. The Sciences in Enlightened Europe (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999)
• Schiebinger, Londa, The Mind has No Sex?. Women in the Origins of Modern Science (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1989)
• Murphy, Michelle, Sick Building Syndrome and the Problem of Uncertainty: Environmental Politics, Technoscience, and Women Workers. Duke University Press, 2006
• Thompson, Charis, Making Parents: The Ontological Choreography of Reproductive Technologies. MIT Press, 2007
• Traweek, Sharon, Beamtimes and Lifetimes: The World of High-Energy Physicists (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1988)

 

Experiments & laboratories; practices/techniques/materialities

• Alder, Ken, Engineering the Revolution (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1997)
• Biagioli, Mario, Galileo’s Instruments of Credit: Telescopes, Images, Secrecy (2007)
• Cook, Harold, Matters of Exchange: Commerce, Medicine and Science in the Dutch Golden Age (Yale, 2006)
• Cullen, Christopher, “The science/technology interface in seventeenth-century China: Song Yingxing on qi and the wu xing”. Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies 53 (1990): 295-318.
• Daston, Lorraine and Peter Galison, Objectivity (Brooklyn, NY: Zone Books 2007)
• de Chadarevian, Soraya, Designs for Life: Molecular Biology after World War II (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002)
• Edgerton, David, The Shock of the Old: Technology and Global History since 1900 (Profile Books, 2006)
• Fleck, Ludwik, Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1979)
• Foucault, Michel, Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison (New York: Pantheon, 1977)
• Galison, Peter, Einstein's Clocks, Poincaré's Maps: Empires of Time (New York: Norton, 2003)
• Kelty, Christopher M. Two Bits: The Cultural Significance of Free Software. Duke University Press, 2008.
• Kohler, Robert E., Lords of the Fly: Drosophila Genetics and the Experimental Life (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994)
• Landecker, Hannah. Culturing Life: How Cells Became Technologies. Harvard University Press, 2007.
• Latour, Bruno, Science in Action (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1987)
• Mitman, Gregg. Breathing Space: How Allergies Shape Our Lives and Landscapes. Yale University Press, 2007.
• Murphy, Michelle. Sick Building Syndrome and the Problem of Uncertainty: Environmental Politics, Technoscience, and Women Workers. Duke University Press, 2006.
• Najita, Tetsuo "On Culture and Technology in Postmodern Japan," Postmodernism and Japan, eds. Masao Miyoshi & H. D. Harootunian (Duke, 1989).
• Newman, William, Atoms and Alchemy: Chymistry and the Experimental Origins of the Scientific Revolution (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006)
• Rheinberger, Hans-Jorg, Toward a History of Epistemic Things: Synthesizing Proteins in the Test Tube (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1997)
• Shapin, Steven and Simon Schaffer, Leviathan and the Air Pump (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1985)
• Smith, Crosbie, and M. Norton Wise, Energy and Empire (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1989)
• Thompson, Charis. Making Parents: The Ontological Choreography of Reproductive Technologies. MIT Press, 2007.
• Thompson, Emily, The Soundscape of Modernity: Architectural Acoustics and the Culture of Listening in America (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2002)
• Wise, M. Norton, ed., The Values of Precision (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995)

 

Colonial/Imperial Science, Technology, and Medicine

See supplementary short bibliography.