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Sarah Abrevaya Stein


Professor & Maurice Amado Endowed Chair in Sephardic Studies


Contact Information

Email    sstein@history.ucla.edu
Office  6296 Bunche Hall
Phone  310-825-4153

Sarah Abrevaya Stein received her A.B. from Brown University in 1993 and her doctorate from Stanford University in 1999. Her scholarship has ranged across the Yiddish and Ladino speaking diasporas and the British and French imperial, Russian, American, Ottoman and wider Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, and North African settings, but is always engaged with the cultural, economic, and political intricacies of modern Jewish culture.  

An elected member of the American Academy for Jewish Research and a 2015 Guggenheim Fellow, Stein is the author of Extraterritorial Dreams:  European Citizenship, Sephardi Jews, and the Ottoman Twentieth Century (University of Chicago Press, 2016), winner of a 2016 National Jewish Book Award, Saharan Jews and the Fate of French Algeria (University of Chicago Press, 2014), Plumes: Ostrich Feathers, Jews, and a Lost World of Global Commerce (Yale University Press, 2008), winner of the Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature, and Making Jews Modern: the Yiddish and Ladino Press in the Russian and Ottoman Empires (Indiana University Press, hardback 2004), winner of the Salo Wittmayer Baron Prize for Best First Book in Jewish Studies for 2003 and finalist for the Koret Jewish Book Award in 2004. Stein is  co-editor, with Lia Brozgal, of Ninette of Sin Street (Stanford University Press, 2017), with Julia Phillips Cohen, of Sephardi Lives: A Documentary History, 1700-1950 (Stanford University Press, 2014), winner of a 2014 National Jewish Book Award: and co-editor, and, with Aron Rodrigue, of A Jewish Voice from Ottoman Salonica: The Ladino Memoir of Sa’adi Besalel a-Levi (Stanford University Press, 2012), finalist for a National Jewish Book Award. 


Stein's most recent book is the award-winning Extraterritorial Dreams: European Citizenship, Sephardi Jews and the Ottoman Twentieth Century, (University of Chicago Press, 2016) presented in part as the 2014 George L Mosse Lectures at the University of Wisconsin. This study explores Ottoman Jewish encounters with evolving legal systems that accompanied the dismantling, persistence, and transformation of empires in Europe and across the globe  that took shape as the early modern Ottoman capitulatory system gave way to the modern passport regime.

With the support of a 2015 Guggenheim Fellowship, Stein is now working on The Levis:  A Sephardic Odyssey (Farrar, Straus, & Giroux: Macmillman), a book that will undertake a voyage through the twentieth century and the intertwined histories of a single family, Sephardi Jewry, and the dramatic ruptures that transformed southeastern Europe and the Judeo-Spanish diaspora. This book will also trace the history of a collection, reflecting on how one family archive came to be built and preserved, and how it knit together a family even as the historic Sephardi heartland of southeastern Europe was unraveling.

Stein is co-editor (with David Biale of UCD) of Stanford University Press Series in Jewish History and Culture and co-editor (with Tony Michels and Ken Moss) of Jewish Social Studies.

Awards

Sarah Stein's research has been supported by a Guggenheim Fellowship, two National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships, a National Endowment for the Humanities Scholarly Editions and Translations Grant, a Charles A. Ryskamp Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies, by the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Research, the Hadassah-Brandeis Institute, and the Maurice Amado Foundation, among other sources. Her scholarship has been awarded a 2016 National Jewish Book Award (for Extraterritorial Dreams), a 2014 National Jewish Book Award (for Sephardi Lives), the 2012 Walter D. Love Article Prize of the North American Conference of British Studies (for "Protected Persons?"), the 2008 Higby Prize by the Modern European section of the American Historical Association for Best Article in The Journal of Modern History (for "Falling into Feathers"), and the Salo Wittmayer Baron Prize for the Best First Book in Jewish Studies (2003, for Making Jews Modern). She is also co-winner of the Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature (2010, for Plumes) and an elected member of the American Academy for Jewish Research.

Selected Publications

Books

Ninette of Sin Street, Lia Brozgal and Sarah Abrevaya Stein, editors (Stanford University Press, 2017).


Extraterritorial Dreams: European Citizenship, Sephardi Jews, and the Ottoman Twentieth Century (University of Chicago Press, 2016).  Winner of a 2016 National Jewish Book Award.


Saharan Jews and the Fate of French Algeria
 (University of Chicago Press, 2014).

Sephardi Lives: A Documentary History, 1700-1950, Julia Phillips Cohen and Sarah Abrevaya Stein, editors (Stanford University Press, 2014). Winner of a 2014 National Jewish Book Award; 2015 Association of Jewish Libraries Reference Award, Honorable Mention.

A Jewish Voice from Ottoman Salonica: The Ladino Memoir of Sa’adi Besalel a-Levi, , Aron Rodrigue and Sarah Abrevaya Stein, co-editors, translation and glossary by Isaac Jerusalmi (Stanford University Press, 2012).

Plumes: Ostrich Feathers, Jews, and a Lost World of Global Commerce (Yale University Press, 2008). 52nd Annual New England Book Show Winner, Winner of the Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature. Paperback published 2010.

Making Jews Modern: the Yiddish and Ladino Press in the Russian and Ottoman Empires (Indiana University Press, 2004). Winner of the Salo Wittmayer Baron Prize for Best First Book in Jewish Studies for 2003; Koret Jewish Book Award Finalist, 2004. Paperback published 2006.

Book-related web material 
2012 Online companion to A Jewish Voice from Ottoman Salonica: the Ladino Memoir of Sa’adi Besalel a-Levi (Stanford University Press) featuring reproduction of original, soletreo [Ladino handwritten, cursive] memoir with cross-references to romanized Ladino transliteration and English-language translation.


Select articles

2017  With Tony Michels and Ken Moss, “Jewish Studies Confronts the Trump Era:  Editors’ Introduction,” Jewish Social Studies (Spring/Summer, 2017).

2016 “Contentious Archives and the Algerian Jewish Past,” solicited contribution to “Histoire d’archives,” special issue of Archives Juives.


2015 "Black Holes, Dark Matter, and Buried Troves: decolonization and the multi-sited archives of Algerian Jewish history,” American Historical Review 120/3, June.

2015 "Citizens of a Fictional Nation: Ottoman-born Jews in France during the First World War,” Past & Present 226/1.

2014 “The Field of In Between,” solicited contribution to roundtable forum, “Jewish identities in the Middle East, 1876-1956,”International Journal of Middle East Studies 46/3.

2012 With Susan Slymovics, “Jews and Colonial Algeria,” Journal of North African Studies 17/4.

2012 “Dividing south from north: French colonialism, Jews, and the Algerian Sahara,” Journal of North African Studies 17/4 (online version, 25 September).

2011 “Protected Persons? The Baghdadi Jewish Diaspora, the British State, and the Creation of the Jewish Colonial,” The American Historical Review (February). Winner, 2012 Walter D. Love Article Prize of the North American Conference of British Studies.

2010 With Julia Phillips Cohen, “Sephardic Scholarly Worlds: Toward a Novel Geography of Modern Jewish History.” Jewish Quarterly Review 100:3 (Summer).

2009 “American Deaf Jewish culture in historical and trans-national context,” American Jewish History 94/3, (September).

2007 “‘Falling into Feathers’: Jews and the trans-Atlantic ostrich feather trade,” The Journal of Modern History 79/4 (Winter): 772-812. Winner of the Higby Prize by the Modern European section of the American Historical Association, for best article in The Journal of Modern History, 2006-2008.

2007 “Mediterranean Jewries and Global Commerce in the modern period: on the trail of the Jewish feather trade,” Jewish Social Studies 13.2 (Winter): 1-39.

2006 “Asymmetric Fates: Secular Yiddish and Ladino Culture in Comparison,” Jewish Quarterly Review 96.4 (Fall), 498-509.

Current Courses by Term

2017 Fall Quarter

Capstone Seminar: History -- Jewish History

Departmental Seminar: Approaches, Methods, Debates, Practices

2018 Winter Quarter

Contemporary World History, 1760 to Present

Teaching Apprentice Practicum

Previous Courses by Term

2017 Spring Quarter

Seminar: Jewish History

2017 Winter Quarter

Holocaust: History and Memory

Seminar: Jewish History

2015 Winter Quarter

Holocaust: History and Memory

Introduction to Historical Practice: Variable Topics in Jewish History

2014 Winter Quarter

Seminar: Jewish History

2013 Fall Quarter

Holocaust: History and Memory

Seminar: Jewish History

2012 Spring Quarter

Holocaust: History and Memory

Capstone Seminar: History -- Jewish History

2012 Winter Quarter

Advanced Historiography: Theory of History

2011 Winter Quarter

Seminar: Jewish History

2010 Fall Quarter

Capstone Seminar: History -- Jewish History

Seminar: Jewish History

2010 Spring Quarter

Spirit of Secularism: Jewish Cultures in Secular Age

Capstone Seminar: History -- Jewish History

Topics in History: Jewish History

2010 Winter Quarter

Advanced Historiography: Jewish History

2009 Spring Quarter

Seminar: Jewish History

Previous Courses by Course

HIST 291B
Seminar: Jewish History

2017 Spring Quarter

2014 Winter Quarter

2011 Winter Quarter

2009 Spring Quarter

HIST 5
Holocaust: History and Memory

2017 Winter Quarter

2015 Winter Quarter

2013 Fall Quarter

2012 Spring Quarter

HIST 291A
Seminar: Jewish History

2017 Winter Quarter

2013 Fall Quarter

2010 Fall Quarter

HIST 97L
Introduction to Historical Practice: Variable Topics in Jewish History

2015 Winter Quarter

HIST 191L
Capstone Seminar: History -- Jewish History

2012 Spring Quarter

2010 Fall Quarter

2010 Spring Quarter

HIST 200Q
Advanced Historiography: Theory of History

2012 Winter Quarter

HIST 201R
Topics in History: Jewish History

2010 Spring Quarter

HIST M182G
Spirit of Secularism: Jewish Cultures in Secular Age

2010 Spring Quarter

HIST 200R
Advanced Historiography: Jewish History

2010 Winter Quarter