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Grad Students
  • Ceren Abi

    Subfield: Modern Middle East, Late Ottoman Empire, Mandate Syria and Iraq, Visual Culture, Archaeology, Museums, World War I, Italian colonialism

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    Email    cerenabi@ucla.edu
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  • Anna Accettola

    Subfield: Ancient Greek Trade; Classical and Hellenistic periods; Nabataean Kingdom; Ancient Economics; Network and Trade Theory

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    Email    ajaccettola@ucla.edu
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  • K Herman Adney

    Subfield: Near East

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    Email    kalebherman@g.ucla.edu
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  • Azzah Ahmed

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  • Samuel D. Anderson

    My dissertation is an institutional history of the médersas, "Franco-Muslim" schools that provided both Islamic and European education in French colonial northwest Africa from the 1850s to the 1950s. I examine the role of these schools in the formation of a bi-cultural Muslim intermediary class and the trans-Saharan impact of the médersa model on relationships between Muslim communities and French colonizers. I have conducted archival and oral history research for this project in Algeria, France, Mauritania, and Senegal. I also have a secondary project analyzing the tensions of Pan-Africanist ideologies of culture, especially at the First Pan-African Cultural Festival in Algiers in 1969.

    Subfield: Modern Africa, especially northwest Africa (Maghrib, Sahara, Sahel); Islam; colonialism

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    Email    samuelanderson@ucla.edu
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  • Jorge Arias

    Subfield: Late Roman and Early Medieval Iberia, archaeology, Colonial Latin America

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    Email    jarias@ucla.edu
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  • Sohaib Baig

    Subfield: South Asia, Islam in South Asia, Indian Ocean,

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    Email    baigs@ucla.edu
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  • Roi Ball

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  • Grace A. Ballor

    Dissertation Overview: With the rise of American and Asian firms in the 1960s and 1970s, fueled by technological revolutions, deregulation and financialization, European companies in comparison found themselves increasingly relegated to the margins of the globalizing economy. In response and with confidence inspired by the early steps toward integration, many European firms regionalized, expanding beyond their domestic markets and into a larger regional market. In addition to the development of these regional supply and value chains, European multinational firms also appealed for further integration by means of organized interest groups, service as policy consultants, regional industry associations and interpersonal networks between firm executives and politicians in Brussels. By the mid 1980s, these efforts helped to re-launch the stalled integration process with the Single Europe Act, and by 1992 the Internal Market was complete. By conducting case studies of firms from three primary economic sectors and situating them within the broader history of European integration, this dissertation project examines European multinational firms as agents of integration. This dissertation project is part of a larger research agenda on the economic history of modern Europe, centered around themes of political economy, capitalism, and the relationships between society and economy.

    Subfield: Modern Europe Economic History European Union Political Economy Capitalism Globalization Business History

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    Email    gballor@ucla.edu
    Office  Bunche Hall
  • Christopher Bates

    Dissertation: What They Fight For -- The Men and Women of Reenactment. An examination of the modern phenomenon of reenacting, and what it can tell us about the memory of the Civil War and the place of history in modern America.

    Subfield: U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction

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    Email    jrhtp@ucla.edu
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  • Chris Bingley

    My primary research interests concern religion, gender, and notions of empire during the High Roman Empire through the early period of Late Antiquity. My eventual dissertation will investigate the changing nature of how Romans imagined Greek culture in the eastern Mediterranean during the third and fourth centuries C.E. and how urban populations negotiated imperial identity.

    Subfield: Late Antiquity, Roman History, Greek History

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    Email    cbingley@ucla.edu
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  • Tania Bride

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  • Sebastiaan Broere

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  • Scottie Buehler CPM

    Scottie's specialty is the history of midwifery, obstetrics, and gynecology from 1500-1800 in France and England. Other interests include the history of medicine more generally and history of the body. Her dissertation focuses on midwifery training in late eighteenth century France and the texts, objects, and images used.

    Subfield: History of Science and Medicine

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    Email    scottiecpm@ucla.edu
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  • Jennifer Carcamo

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  • Peter Chesney

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  • Xiang Chi

    Sovereignty, War, and Natural Resource: Northeast China’s Economic Development (1901-1931) My dissertation project aims at offering a comparative analysis of the emergences, practices and values of state rationality in terms of the capacity to exert control over timber resources in Northeast China between the Japanese and Chinese forestry regime-making in the early 20th century, focusing on the state planning, the government-firm relation, Korean migration, and the forest species hierarchy change in Fengtian and Jilin provinces during 1901-1937. The interplay between Japanese merchants, Chinese huozhan leaders, and Korean migration showed the multi-layered sovereignty conceptions. The involvement of the Mitsui timber firms changed the hierarchy of the forest species and contributed to the efficiency growth in the 1930s that the PRC government inherited.

    Subfield: Modern Chinese History; Environmental History, Economic History, Social History of Forests, History of Manchuria, History of Japanese Imperialism

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    Email    xiangchi@ucla.edu
    Office  Bunche2113
  • Iris I. Clever

    My dissertation focuses on the production, circulation, and use of anthropometric data in the early twentieth century and its deployment for racial research. I am interested in anthropometric measurement practices, its techniques and materialities, the role of statistical methods in processing data and producing racial categories, as well as conflicts over anthropometric techniques. This dissertation brings together a transnational group of scholars whose work relied heavily on data practices and who were central to the development of physical anthropology (UK/US/Germany). Moreover, it traces the history of a single anthropological instrument: the caliper. The caliper not only connects the encounters during which measurements were taken with the production of data, it also allows me to trace the use of anthropometric methods after World War II: where the caliper mostly measured skulls and heads before the war, the instrument transformed into a skinfold device in the 1950s to meet the research efforts of health studies.

    Subfield: History of Science and Medicine

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    Email    irisclever@ucla.edu
    Office  6265 Bunche Hall
  • Elizabeth Comuzzi

    Elizabeth Comuzzi is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of History at UCLA. She is interested in the economic and social history of the late medieval Mediterranean (c. 1000-1450), with a particular focus on medieval Catalonia during the 13th and 14th centuries. Her dissertation research explores the economy and economic connections of the Pyrenean town of Puigcerdà and its surrounding region between 1260 and 1360. This research contributes to broader discussions on the nature of economic change around the year 1300, the rise of the Catalan Cloth industry and the extent of regional economic interconnection in the late medieval Mediterranean.

    Subfield: Medieval European History

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    Email    ecomuzzi@ucla.edu
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  • Beatriz Cruz-Lopez

    Subfield: Latin America

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  • Lori De Lucia

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    Email    ldelucia@ucla.edu
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  • Michael Dean

    Subfield: United States

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  • Arnon Degani

    Currently I am interested in how the mechanisms of the Israeli state prior to 1967 contributed to the incorporation of the Palestinian-Arab citizens of Israel into the Israeli body politic. Methodologically, I have a bias towards extensive archival research of the Israeli civic and military bureaucracy which contain many small instances where the system was challenged by individual people and unforeseen circumstances. These vignettes reveal the daily struggles the Palestinian-Arab citizens faced but also shed light on the inner logic of Zionism. Analytically, my research utilizes a particular reading of the theoretical literature of settler colonial studies which takes note of the historical tendency of settler colonial societies to enact inclusive political frameworks with remnants of the indigenous population.

    Subfield: Colonialism; Settler-Colonialism; Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

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    Email    arnondeg@gmail.com
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  • Rebecca Dufendach

    MA Thesis: Injecting Modernity: Regulating Hygiene in Porfirian Oaxaca, Mexico

    Subfield: Ethnohistory, Indigenous Laguages of the Americas, Latin America, Colonial Mexico

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    Email    rdufendach(at)ucla(dot)edu
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  • Jeffrey Dymond

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  • Max Flomen

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  • Alfred Flores

    My dissertation is entitled, "Little Island into Mighty Base: Indigeneity, Race, and U.S. Empire in Guam, 1941-1962," which examines the U.S. military expansion of Guam through indigenous land stewardship and civilian military labor. This process of militarization resulted in various interracial encounters among Chamorros, Filipinos, and white Americans that were peaceful, violent, and in some instances deadly. Thus, my study underscores the connections between empire, indigeneity, and diaspora in a highly contested racialized island. This project relies on a transnational approach that includes archival sources from California, Guam, Maryland, the Philippines, and Washington D.C. These records are combined with oral history interviews that I conducted on Guam with activists, educators, professors, farmers, landowners, former civilian military laborers, and former politicians."

    Subfield: 20th Century United States History; Pacific Islander History; Asian American History; Native American History; Empire; Immigration; Indigeneity; Labor; Race/Ethnicity; Oral History; U.S. and the World.

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    Email    apflores@ucla.edu
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  • Daniel Franken

    I use anthropometric evidence on human stature to track the secular trend in material well-being of the Brazilian population from 1830 to 1960. During that interim, the Brazilian economy and polity underwent profound structural transitions. The extant data on living standards has prevented scholars from understanding the consequences of export-led growth and industrialization. My preliminary data culled from military records?a previously untapped source?display significant improvement in physical stature beginning in the 1880s, when modernization and industrialization began. I hypothesize that the confluence of real income growth, improved education, health, and sanitation account for the upswing in the standard of living.

    Subfield: Latin America, economic history, Brazil

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    Email    franken.daniel@gmail.com
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  • Emily Frantz

    Subfield: Science

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  • Ricardo Garcia

    At the moment (July 2013), I am beginning my dissertation, which examines a series of sixteenth and seventeenth-century letters from what is now western Mexico. These were written in Nahuatl and with the Roman alphabet.

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    Email    rmedinagarcia@yahoo.com rmedinagarcia@ucla.edu
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  • Nicole Gilhuis

    Subfield: Atlantic World, Atlantic World Religion, Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, Colonial Empires

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    Email    ngilhuis@ucla.edu
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  • Sebastian Glen

    Subfield: Europe

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  • Amy Gordanier

    Chinese opera, actors and entertainers, migration, native-place networks

    Subfield: Late Imperial China

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    Email    agordanier@ucla.edu
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  • Hippolyte A. Goux

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    Email    goux@ucla.edu
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  • Jacob Green

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  • Kurt Guldentops

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  • Xiaowen Hao

    Subfield: China

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  • Caroline Harris

    My dissertation seeks to uncover the meaning of interracial worship at the Azusa Street Revival and its subsequent fading from Pentecostal practice by the second decade of the twentieth century. Charting the migrations of the revival's participants, from the Midwest and South to Los Angeles beginning in the 1880s, I argue that an understanding of the racial landscapes of Los Angeles, as well as currents of religious thought from earlier revival moments in American history, will aid our understanding of Pentecostalism?s nascent growth in Southern California. The imagined meanings of religion and race worked in tandem to not just foster the development of early Pentecostalism, but also cut short its socially transgressive practices.

    Subfield: American West, African American History, History of Religion

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    Email    cbunnell@ucla.edu
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  • Elle Harvell

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  • Joshua Herr

    Subfield: Ming, Qing China; Vietnam

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    Email    jherr@ucla.edu
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  • Ryan Hilliard

    Subfield: History of Gender and Sexuality; Early Modern Europe; France; Gender Studies; Singleness Studies

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    Email    rhilliard@ucla.edu
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  • Qianqing Huang

    Subfield: Japan

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  • Richard Ibarra

    Subfield: Medieval and Early Modern Europe (Spain and Italy)

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    Email    richardibarraucla@gmail.com
    Office  Bunche 2169
  • Erdem Ilter

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  • Marissa Jenrich

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  • Sarah Johnson

    Subfield: Jewish

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  • Naveen Kanalu Ramamurthy

    My dissertation research examines the nature and structure of Islamicate sovereignty in the seventeenth-century Mughal Empire in South Asia. I develop a historical narrative on the rise of Sunni legalist discourse, which led to jurisprudential reforms and the compilation of the imperial legal code, Al-fatawa al-‘alamgiriyya or “The Institutions of the World Conqueror” in the 1660s. Questioning the prevalent historiographical position, which attributes these changes to the Mughal emperor, Aurangzeb’s (r. 1658–1707) “Islamic orthodoxy” and conservative policies, my research focuses instead on political rivalries between Sunni legal authorities, networks, and institutions in the recomposition of the political institution of Sultanate. The systematization of law for the first time transformed the Mughal State from a more flexible Turko-Persian entity it inherited from the Delhi Sultanate into a regionalized empire under greater centralized control. Examining a large corpus of Persian and Arabic legal and political texts, which have been understudied, my dissertation seeks to demonstrate how the Mughal polity increasingly constituted itself as a “body-politic” in Islamic jurisprudential terms. In my research, I critically reassess the status and characteristics of early modern Islamic law, the posterity of Aurangzeb’s compilation, and other Mughal jurisprudential treatises as they formed the basis for colonial modes of governance of Muslim communities and what came to be known as “Anglo-Mohammedan” law in late nineteenth-century British India.

    Subfield: Early Modern South AsiaSeventeenth-century Mughal EmpirePremodern Islamicate CultureLegal and Political ThoughtCritical Theory 

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    Email    naveenkanal@gmail.com
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  • Adam Kasarda

    Subfield: Archaic & Classical Greek political history;  Greek intellectual history;  environmental history

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    Email    ajkasarda@ucla.edu
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  • Samuel Keeley

    Subfield: Modern European History, 19th Century Germany, Immigration

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    Email    sbkeeley@ucla.edu
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  • Yatta Kiazolu

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  • Lindsay King

    Subfield: Modern European Jewish History

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    Email    lindsayking@ucla.edu
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  • Andrew Klein

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  • Brian Kovalesky

    Subfield: 20th Century U.S.; Southern California; History of Education

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    Email    briankov@ucla.edu
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  • Vipin Krishna

    Subfield: South/Southeast Asia

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    Email    vipin@g.ucla.edu
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  • Sunkyu Lee

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  • John Leisure

    Researching the emergence of middle class consumer households in postwar Japan using danchi apartment complexes as a site of social change.(B.A. History, University of Southern California; B.A. Political Science, University of Southern California; M.A. Regional Studies East Asia, Columbia University; Fulbright Fellow, Japan)

    Subfield: Modern Japan

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    Email    leisure@ucla.edu
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  • Janice Levi

    Janice Levi's project primarily centers on the oral narrative of the House of Israel (Ghana) and how their faith identity is constructed through knowledge of oral histories, performative/ritual memory, and encounters with normative Judaism. Her project seeks to historicize the oral narrative through archival record, practical memory, and via sites of memory (archaeological and abstract). Additionally, she is interested in how ideological trends concerning Hebraic heritage (may have) influenced the narrative of this community.

    Subfield: African History | Research Interests: African History, Jewish History, Memory Studies, Identity Studies, Race Politics, and Material Culture

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    Email    jrlevi@g.ucla.edu
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  • Pauline Lewis

    Pauline is a PhD candidate in the Modern Middle Eastern field, specializing in the history of transnational technology and technical expertise in Ottoman and post-Ottoman societies. Her dissertation, "A Sociotechnical History of the Telegraph in the Modern Ottoman Empire, 1855-1908," explores the connection between telegraphy and the emergence of new practices and discourses in the empire, specifically the concepts of territorial sovereignty and technocratic authority, alternative understandings of space and time, and the entanglement of private capital and public infrastructure. For this project, she drew on a range of sources in Ottoman Turkish, Arabic, and French, including documents from the Ottoman state archives; biographies of Ottoman telegraphers; literary, musical, and visual texts; records from British telegraph companies; and maps and circulars from the International Telegraph Union. Research: Ottoman Empire; History of Technology; Modern Middle East

    Subfield: Modern Middle East

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    Email    plucylew@ucla.edu
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  • Chien-Ling Liu

    Subfield: European Medicine in China, History of Medicine

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    Email    chienlingliu@ucla.edu
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  • Fredrick Walter Lorenz

    Fredrick Walter Lorenz's research focuses on migrations and empire shaping in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth-century Ottoman Empire. He studies the political and social effects of the large-scale movement and resettlement of refugees from the Balkans into Anatolia and Arab provinces under Ottoman rule.

    Subfield: Modern Middle East, Late Ottoman Empire, Ottoman Balkans

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    Email    florenz@ucla.edu
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  • Daniel Lynch

    “Southern California Chivalry: The Convergence of Southerners and Californios in the Far Southwest, 1846-1866.” Ph.D. diss., 2015.

    Subfield: US, World, History Education

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    Email    daniellynch@ucla.edu
    Office  Bunche 6250
  • Kristina Markman

    Dissertation: Between Two Worlds: A Comparative Study of the Representations of Pagan Lithuania in the Chronicles of the Teutonic Order and Rus'

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    Email    kmarkman@ucla.edu
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  • Amanda Martinez

    Subfield: 20th Century United States, Race and Popular Music, Political History

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    Email    amamartinez@ucla.edu
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  • Michael R. Matthews

    Greek History; Ethnogenesis; Transmission of Thought; Difference

    Subfield: Ancient Greece & Rome

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    Email    mmatth62@g.ucla.edu
    Office  Bunche Hall
  • Preston S. McBride

    Dissertation: A Lethal Education: Institutionalized Negligence, Epidemiology, and Death in United States Off-Reservation American Indian Boarding Schools, 1879-1934

    Subfield: 18th-20th Century U.S. & American Indian History American Indian Off-reservation Boarding Schools American Indian Health

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    Email    pmcbride@ucla.edu
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  • Kelly Midori Mccormick

    Kelly McCormick is a doctoral student in modern Japanese history whose research analyzes Japanese camera as the intersection of visual and consumer culture. She is exploring the invention, depictions, and marketing of the Japanese optical industries from the 1930s to the 1970s. Through analysis of women's magazines, photography magazines, photobooks, and in-depth interviews with photographers and designers she is developing a picture of how discourses on gendered applications of photography, healthy families, economic recovery, and national identity were deeply tied to the domestic and international success of the Japanese camera. In addition, her project sheds light on the role that the Japanese camera played in the history of postwar photography in Japan and internationally, from amateur to photojournalistic uses of new lenses and films. Before coming to UCLA, she completed an M.A. in East Asian Languages and Cultures at Columbia University (2012) and received her B.A. from UC Santa Cruz (2008). Kelly has lived in Kagoshima, Osaka, Hakodate, Yokohama, and Tokyo, Japan.

    Subfield: Modern Japan; History of photography, technology, gender, consumer culture, and design

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    Email    kelly.midorim@gmail.com
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  • Devin McCutchen

    Subfield: 20th Century US, California, Western US, Urban, Planning, Cultural, Oral History, Public History

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    Email    devinmccutchen@ucla.edu
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  • Joshua McGuffie

    Subfield: History of Science, Environmental History, History of the Western United States

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    Email    jmcguffi@ucla.edu
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  • Juan Pablo Mercado

    Juan Pablo is a PhD candidate in U.S. History specializing in Chicana and Chicano History and currently is a managing editor for Regeneración Tlacuilolli: UCLA Raza Studies Journal. Juan Pablo is also an interviewer for the UCLA Library’s Center for Oral History Research, conducting oral histories on the High Potential Program at UCLA between 1968-1971.

    Subfield: Twentieth-Century United States; Chicana/o History

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    Email    jpmercado@ucla.edu
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  • Sean Messarra

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  • Juan Pablo Morales Garza

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  • Patrick Morgan

    Subfield: Medieval

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    Email    patmorgan@g.ucla.edu
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  • Makeda Njorge

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  • Christopher Null

    Subfield: U.S. History, Legal History, 19th Century

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    Email    crnull@ucla.edu
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  • Michael O'Sullivan

    Subfield: Middle East and South Asia

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  • Daniel Ohanian

    structure and agency; cross-cultural collaboration; 1700–1930; Ottoman and Armenian history

    Subfield: Near East; Armenian; Ottoman

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    Email    dohanian@ucla.edu
    Office  2169 Bunche Hall
  • Nana Osei-Opare

    Nana Osei-Opare is a Ph.D. Candidate in UCLA’s Department of History, focusing on twentieth-century African history. His tentative dissertation title is "The African Revolutionaries: Labor, Bureaucracy, State-Capitalism & Revolution in Ghana, 1957-1966." His research interests include the first socialist African revolution, the coherency of Kwame Nkrumah’s political and economic ideas, and Ghana’s economic and state-building methods in relation to the Soviet Union’s New Economic Policy. While his work is primarily Ghana-centric, it explores how the intellectual processes and formulations in the United States, Britain, the Caribbean, the Soviet Union, and other African nations shaped and intersected in Ghana.

    Subfield: Intellectual African History, Black Radical Tradition, Ghanaian State, State Capitalism, Modernization, Soviet Union, Intellectual Networks, South Africa

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    Email    oseiopare@ucla.edu
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  • Caitlin Parker

    Dissertation working title: \Mayor Bradley's Los Angeles: Urban Governance in an Era of Austerity, 1973-1993\""

    Subfield: 20th Century US; urban; political; spatial; race and ethnicity

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    Email    caitlinparker@ucla.edu
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  • Marissa Petrou

    Science museums, history of anthropology, German history of science in the Kaiserreich, visual culture of science and scientific publications.

    Subfield: History of Science, Medicine and Technology

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    Email    mpetrou@ucla.edu
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  • Joshua Rahtz

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  • Bernard James Remollino

    Subfield: United States

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    Email    bremollino@g.ucla.edu
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  • Kathryn Renton

    Subfield: Intellectual & Cultural History of Europe; Early modern Spain; Early modern France; History of Science

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    Email    kathrynrenton@ucla.edu
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  • Kevin Richardson

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  • Susan Rosenfeld

    Trans-Atlantic slave trade; West African history; mythology and folklore; Afro-Brazilian returnees; Afro-Caribbean intellectual and cultural production and radicalism; Pan-Africanism; and Yoruba systems of divination. I am also working as a research assistant for the Marcus Garvey and UNIA Papers Project under Professor Robert Hill.

    Subfield: African History; History of the African Diaspora; Yoruba History; History of Afro-Brazilian returnees

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    Email    susanrosenfeld@ucla.edu
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  • Cassia Roth

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  • Twyla Ruby

    Subfield: History of science and medicine in early modern Europe, visual and material culture

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    Email    truby@ucla.edu
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  • Winter Schneider

    Property Ownership, Race, Political Subjectivity, Militarization and Historicity in nineteenth-century Haiti and the Caribbean

    Subfield: Latin American and Caribbean History, Afro-Atlantic History, Environment and History

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    Email    winschneider@ucla.edu
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  • Elisabeth Schoepflin

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  • Robert Schraff

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  • Fernando Serrano

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  • Fernando Serrano

    In my research I consider the impact of silver mining in colonial Guanajuato on the indigenous cummunities that provided the labor force for the mines. In particular, I consider the participation of workers from Purépecha communities in Michoacan.

    Subfield: Latin American History; Ethnohistory; Colonial Mexican History; Michoacán and Guanajuato

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    Email    fernandoserrano@ucla.edu
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  • Chris Silver

    My work focuses on the socio-cultural role(s) played by Jews in the North African music industry in the twentieth century.

    Subfield: Modern Jewish and North African History; Music

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    Email    chrisilver@ucla.edu
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  • Jeremiah Sladeck

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  • Sabrina Smith

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  • Rachel Smith

    Subfield: modern Jewish history, history of ethnography, Sephardic studies, Ottoman Empire

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    Email    rachel.smith@ucla.edu
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  • David Spielman

    Subfield: African

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  • Tatiana Sulovska

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  • Sona Tajiryan

    Early Modern Trade Network of Julfa Armenians

    Subfield: Armenian Studies

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    Email    stajiryan@ucla.edu
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  • Madina Thiam

    Subfield: African HistoryAfrican Diaspora HistoryIslamic HistoryIntellectual HistoryGlobal History

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    Email    mthiam@ucla.edu
    Office  Bunche 2155
  • Jennifer Tiari

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  • Matthijs Tieleman

    Subfield: Atlantic History, Dutch history, American revolutionary history, the history of espionage and information states.

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    Email    matthijs.tieleman@gmail.com
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  • WANG Yōu

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    Email    wangyou@ucla.edu
    Office  Bunche 2207
  • Marjan Wardaki

    My research focuses on Asian and Middle Eastern students and educators, who travelled to Europe, in particular interwar Germany, to study at technical universities. I examine their early years of study at these educational centers, and trace their lives and scholarship into a complex trajectory of German-Asian knowledge production and flow. My research employs a mobile heuristic tool that blends global- and microhistory.

    Subfield: South Asia and Europe

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    Email    mwardaki@ucla.edu
    Office  Bunche Hall 2207
  • Adam Woodhouse

    My doctoral research considers the place of the Roman Republic and its imperialism in the formation of Italian humanist thinking about empire from c. 1350 to c. 1550, culminating in a systematic reconstruction of Machiavelli's theory of republican empire in his Discourses on Livy.

    Subfield: Late Medieval and Early Modern European Intellectual History

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    Email    adam.woodhouse@icloud.com
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  • Harrison Woods

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  • Maia Woolner

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  • Masayoshi Yamada

    Subfield: United States

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  • Dong Yan

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    Email    dongyan84@ucla.edu
    Office  c/o 6265 Bunche Hall
  • Meng ZHANG

    My dissertation, titled “Timber Trade along the Yangzi River: Market, Environment, and Frontier, 1750-1930,” provides the first reconstruction of the overall structure of the south China timber trade during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries with hand-collected data and situates the story of timber in a broader perspective. Timber and its cultivation, trade, and taxation provide the focal points for addressing a number of central debates regarding state building, political economy, and business paradigms in Chinese history.

    Subfield: social and economic history in early modern and modern China; trade networks and commercial organizations; frontier economy, ethnicity, and environment.

    Contact Information

    Email    meng.zhang@ucla.edu
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