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Graduate Students

  • ABI, CEREN - cerenabi@ucla.edu ( (M.A. European History, Leiden University EUROPAEUM Program,the Netherlands, France and UK; B.A. History and Political Science, Istanbul Bilgi University, Turkey)) Subfield: Modern Middle East, Late Ottoman Empire, Mandate Syria and Iraq, Visual Culture, Archaeology, Museums, World War I, Italian colonialism
  • ALVAREZ, MILO M. - alvarezm@ucla.edu (UCLA, C. Phil., U.S. History UC Riverside, M.A., U.S. History UCLA, B.A., Major: History, Minor: Chicana/o Studies ) Subfield: 20th Century U.S. History, Long Civil Rights Movement, Chicana/o History, Chicano Movement, 1960s-70s - Dissertation: "On the Shoulders of Generations: The Brown Berets of Aztlan in the Long Civil Rights Era" is a national history of the Chicano Movement through the prism of the Brown Berets organizations, which emerged from 1968-1981 throughout the United States. This study also engages and advances the Long Civil Rights Movement" (LCRM) construct by contextualizing the Chicano Movement within the Long Civil Rights Era. Thus, my work intends shed light on how we may rethink the Chicano Movement as a national phenomenon that impacts our understandings of Civil Rights in the United States.
  • ANDERSON, SAMUEL D. - samuelanderson@ucla.edu (C.Phil., UCLA, 2014; M.A., UCLA, 2013; B.A., Vassar College, 2009) Subfield: Trans-Saharan Africa, French colonialism, Islam in Africa
  • APTER, NORMAN D. - napter@ucla.edu (Ph.D. in Modern Chinese History, 2013. M.A., in East Asian Studies, University of Virginia, 1999. B.A. in History, The College of William and Mary, 1995.) Subfield: Late Imperial and Modern China, Modern Japan, Modern Russia - Research interests include state-society relations, history of social relief, history of children and childhood, and urban development in modern China. Dissertation title: "Saving the Young: A History of the Child Relief Movement in Modern China." This study investigates the practices and conceptual underpinnings of the project to nurture, educate, train and discipline dependent children (abandoned infants, orphans, child refugees, street urchins) in China from the early 20th century to the present.
  • ARIAS, JORGE CARLOS - jarias@ucla.edu (MA & CPhil in Medieval History, UCLA 2013; BA in Foreign Affairs, University of Virginia, 2007) Subfield: Late Roman and Early Medieval Iberia, archaeology, Colonial Latin America
  • ARIAS, MELANIE - melanie.schmidt.arias at ucla dot edu (C. Phil., History, UCLA 2009 M.A., History, UCLA 2007 B.A., History, Carleton College 2002 ) Subfield: 20th Century U.S., African American History, Urban History, History of Social Science, Policy History - Through the lens of one of the nation's largest social policy experiments, a test of housing allowances begun in 1970, my work traces federal and local policy responses to the advent of civil and gender rights protections in the 1970s. I am interested in how various stakeholders including community members, elected officials, research institutes and federal policymakers revealed their concerns and hope for social change through their responses to this experiment, and in how their responses shaped housing policy at HUD and beyond.
  • BALL, MOLLY CATHERINE - mollyball@ucla.edu mollycball@gmail.com (C.Phil, October 2008; M.A. Latin American History, UCLA, June 2008; B.A. Spanish and History, Clemson University, May 2005) Subfield: Latin America since 1759; Latin American, 1492-1830; economic history - My dissertation uses a set of wage and wage-related data to examine the nature of inequality and industrialization in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, during the Old Republic. Early twentieth century immigration, the international labor market and identifying wage determinants are also key features of my research.
  • BALLOR, GRACE - gballor@ucla.edu (B.A. History, Political Philosophy, International Economics, University of Dallas 2012) Subfield: Economic History
  • BARNHART, MEGAN KATHLEEN - megs@sethi.org
  • BATES, CHRISTOPHER GEORGE - jrhtp@ucla.edu (B.A. in History, UCLA 1996; Masters in History, UCLA 1999.) Subfield: U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction - Dissertation: What They Fight For -- The Men and Women of Reenactment. An examination of the modern phenomenon of reenacting, and what it can tell us about the memory of the Civil War and the place of history in modern America.
  • BENANAV, AARON - abenanav@ucla.edu (BA in History, University of Chicago, 2005) Modern European and American economic history, focusing on the decline of manufacturing and the rise of service-work in the post-war period; also European intellectual history and critical theory: Frankfurt School, psychoanalysis.
  • BINGLEY, CHRIS - cbingley@ucla.edu (B.A., UC Berkeley, Anthropology & Classical Civilizations (2010); Post-Baccalaureate in Classical Studies, University of Pennsylvania (2011) ) Subfield: Late Antiquity, Roman History, Greek History - My interests vary from Roman archaeology to the study of early Christianity in Late Antiquity, but find some common ground in the study of Roman religion. Areas of particular interest include Saint Augustine, imperial cults and veneration of the emperor, and ancient cities.
  • BROWN, DEBORAH ANNA - brownd@ucla.edu (C.Phil., April 2008; M.A., Brown University, May 2003; B.A. in History and African/African-American Studies with Honors in Jewish Studies, Stanford University, June 1999.) Subfield: Modern Europe, Germany, Jewish History, History of Science, History of Statistics, Nationalism, Legal Codes and the Construction of Bureaucracy.
  • CHANG, WINIFRED - winifredchang@ucla.edu (UCLA, Ph.D. in Chinese History, 2012. UCLA, M.A in Chinese History, 2008. Pomona College, B.A. in History and Philosophy (2004). ) Subfield: Taiwan under Japanese colonial rule, modern Chinese history, modern Japanese history, Chinese literature
  • COMUZZI, ELIZABETH ANN - ecomuzzi@ucla.edu (B.A., English Literature and Medieval Studies, Swarthmore College, 2011) Subfield: Medieval European History
  • CRAIG, KATE MELISSA - kmcraig@ucla.edu (C.Phil., History, UCLA (2011) M.A., History, UCLA (2010) B.S., History and Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology (2008)) Subfield: Early and Late Medieval European History, Archaeology, Early Modern European History - My dissertation, "Bringing out the Saints: Journeys of Relics in 10th -12th c. Northern France and Flanders," examines the practice of carrying relics (the physical remains of saints) away from their normal resting places to show that they were used as mobile tools of power which incited conflict and competition as well as devotion. This work challenges conceptions of medieval relics as a force promoting unity across social classes.
  • CROSBY, DANIEL ERIC - dcrosby@ucla.edu (CPhil, History of Science, UCLA, 2005. MA, History of Science, UCLA, 2003. BA, History, Indiana University, 2001. BS, Mathematics, Purdue University, 1999.) Subfield: History of Science; mathematics and computing; philosophy - Dissertation topic: Gödel's Incompleteness Theorem and the Mind-Machine Problem, 1950-2000
  • DALY, HEATHER PONCHETTI - hdaly@ucla.edu (Ph.D. American History (2013); Ph.D. Candidate-American History (C.Phil.2007); M.A. in History, UCLA (2006) B.A. in History, U.C. Irvine/Minor, Native American Studies (2004)) Subfield: Native American History; History of the American West; California Indian History - Research: Political resistance to Indian Reorganization Act and the 1953 Termination Act by Southern California Mission Indians.
  • DE GUZMAN, JEAN-PAUL R. - deguzman.ucla at gmail.com (Ph.D., History, UCLA, 2014 M.A., History, UCLA, 2010 M.A., Asian American Studies, UCLA, 2007 B.A., Asian American Studies and Minor in History, California State University, Northridge, 2004.) Subfield: Major Field: United States, 20th century. Secondary Fields: Asian American history/historiography; urban/suburban; modern immigration; interracial dynamics; Los Angeles. - I filed my dissertation, "'And Make the San Fernando Valley My Home:' Contested Spaces, Identities, and Activism on the Edge of Los Angeles," in June 2014. For more information on my research and current whereabouts, please visit http://jpdeguzman.weebly.com or email me directly for an updated CV. * * * Most broadly, I am concerned with the overlapping dynamics between race, space, and activism. My research investigates the ways in which communities negotiate different forms of racialization and asymmetrical power relations in the context of metropolitan development. To this end, I study the histories of the San Fernando Valley, a well-known Southern California region shaped by the intersections of migration, the military-industrial complex, urban development, racial segregation, political and cultural activism, and popular culture, that defies conventional understandings of cities and suburbs. My dissertation examines different flashpoints in the metropolitan history of the San Fernando Valley and Los Angeles since World War II ranging from the struggle for fair housing to the student rebellions at Valley State to the battle over secession just over a decade ago. This work has been generously funded by the John Randolph Haynes and Dora Haynes Foundation, the Autry National Center, and various institutes within the UC System and at UCLA. At UCLA I taught a number of courses in the Departments of History and Asian American Studies as well as the Undergraduate Education Initiatives' Freshman GE Cluster Program. For my work, the Academic Senate honored me with a University Distinguished Teaching Award in 2013.
  • DEGANI, ARNON YEHUDA - arnondeg@ucla.edu Subfield: Colonialism; Settler-Colonialism; Israeli-Palestinian Conflict - My dissertation will be a historical reconsideration of the relationship between Israel and the Palestinians residing within it between the years 1948-1966. The dissertation chapters will shed light onto different and unexplored socio-cultural aspects of Palestinian daily life, and will try to assess their wider reverberation on the rest of Israeli society. The wider object of my research is to prove that the relationship between the State of Israel and the Palestinian population living within its borders featured both colonial and settler-colonial themes, narratives and political practices.
  • DOWL, AIMEE - aimeedowl at ucla dot edu (B.A., History (Chinese), Reed College; MLA, Washington University in St. Louis; UCLA History of Science) Early modern Europe and Latin America; late modern Latin America; Atlantic world, history of science, technology, and medicine; gender and feminism; Spanish, Italian, Chinese,
  • DUFENDACH, REBECCA - rdufendach(at)ucla.edu Subfield: Latin America, Colonial Mexico, History of Medicine - MA Thesis: Injecting Modernity: Regulating Hygiene in Porfirian Oaxaca, Mexico
  • DYKSTRA, MAURA DOMINIQUE - maurad@ucla.edu Maura Dykstra studies social networks, commercial institutions, law, economics, and the history of empire. Her current project is about debt and dispute mediation among Chongqing merchants from 1750 to 1950.
  • FLORES, ALFRED PEREDO - apflores@ucla.edu (C.Phil. History, UCLA, 2011 Graduate Certificate - Concentration in Asian American Studies, UCLA, 2011 M.A. History, UCLA, 2010 M.A. Public History, UC Riverside, 2006 B.A. History & Minor Political Science, UC Riverside, 2004 A.A. Liberal Arts, College of the Desert, 2001) Subfield: 20th Century United States History; Pacific Islander History; Asian American History; Native American History; Empire; Immigration; Indigeneity; Labor; Race/Ethnicity; Oral History; U.S. and the World. - My dissertation is entitled, "Little Island into Mighty Base: Land, Labor, and U.S. Empire in Guam, 1941-1962," which examines the U.S. military expansion of Guam through indigenous land stewardship and civilian military labor. This process of militarization resulted in various interracial encounters among Chamorros, Filipinos, and white Americans that were peaceful, violent, and in some instances deadly. Thus, my study underscores the connections between empire, indigeneity, and diaspora in a highly contested racialized island. This project relies on a transnational approach that includes archival sources from California, Guam, Maryland, the Philippines, and Washington D.C. These records are combined with oral history interviews that I conducted on Guam with activists, educators, professors, farmers, landowners, former civilian military laborers, and former politicians.
  • FLORES-MARCIAL, XOCHITL M. - xochitlzin@gmail.com (2003 UCLA Los Angeles, CA Ph.D. Program in History Department. Latin American field, focus on Mexican Colonial Period. Interdisciplinary study in the fields of History, Art history and Linguistics. M.A. History (Latin American Field) Winter 2005. 2001 UCLA Los Angeles, CA B.A., Latin American Studies. Minor in Spanish ) Subfield: Colonial Latin America, Ethnohistory, Philology, Zapotec and Nahuatl language documents - Colonial Oaxaca: The Central Valley Zapotec Colonial Zapotec Document Research Group: October 1999 to present. Two hour weekly meetings with a interdisciplinary research group led by Prof. Kevin Terraciano (History, UCLA) and Prof. Pamela Munro (Linguistics). Historic, morphological and syntactic analysis of 16th- 18th century documents, written in Zapotec by native Zapotec speakers. Nahuatl language study group 2003-Present. Spanish and Mexican paleography studies (15th-17th Centuries).
  • FRANKEN, DANIEL WILLIAM - franken.daniel@gmail.com Subfield: Latin America, economic history, Brazil - I use anthropometric evidence on human stature to track the secular trend in material well-being of the Brazilian population from 1830 to 1960. During that interim, the Brazilian economy and polity underwent profound structural transitions. The extant data on living standards has prevented scholars from understanding the consequences of export-led growth and industrialization. My preliminary data culled from military records—a previously untapped source—display significant improvement in physical stature beginning in the 1880s, when modernization and industrialization began. I hypothesize that the confluence of real income growth, improved education, health, and sanitation account for the upswing in the standard of living.
  • GARCIA, RICARDO MEDINA - rmedinagarcia@yahoo.com rmedinagarcia@ucla.edu (UCLA, C.Phil Latin American History; UCLA M.A. History; California State University, Fullerton (CSUF), M.A. Linguistics; Instituto de docencia e investigacion etnologica de Zacatecas, Intensive Course of Ancient and Modern Nahuatl for Nonnative Speakers; CSUF, Single Subject Teaching Credential History; CSUF, B.A. History.) At the moment (July 2013), I am beginning my dissertation, which examines a series of sixteenth and seventeenth-century letters from what is now western Mexico. These were written in Nahuatl and with the Roman alphabet.
  • GERENA, ALEXANDRA ANTONIA - agerena@ucla.edu (C.Phil., UCLA, 2011; M.A., History, UCLA, 2010; B.A., History, Yale University, 2008) Subfield: Early Modern England; Tudor-Stuart Cultural History; Institutional History - My dissertation, tentatively titled ?Master of Patronage: The Revels Office and the Contest for Royal Favor, 1579-1737,? addresses the changing relationship between the English monarchy and the Revels Office (which controlled, though only nominally at times, theatrical licensing and censorship) between 1579 and 1737. I am examining this relationship in light of the nature of political and monarchical patronage and the associated transition from political factionalism to the consolidation of political parties.
  • GIBSON, LELA J. - lela.gibson@ucla.edu (MA, Georgetown University, 2007; BA, Carnegie Mellon University, 2005) Subfield: German History; Ottoman History; Cultural & Intellecutal History; World History; Global History; European History; Middle East History - My dissertation, "Between Aufklärung and Nizam-i Cedid: The German Enlightenment and Ottoman Sufism, 1751-1817," examines knowledge exchange alongside diplomatic encounters between the Ottoman Empire and the German-speaking world. The project highlights cultural and intellectual exchange between Europe and the Islamic world in the late eighteenth century.
  • GILHUIS, NICOLE DANNIELLE - ngilhuis@ucla.edu (B.A. Specialization in History, Minor in Philosophy, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; M.A. in History, University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada) Subfield: Atlantic World, Atlantic World Religion, Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, Colonial Empires
  • GORDANIER, AMY WESTLAKE - agordanier@ucla.edu (B.A. History, Reed College, 2007) Subfield: Late Imperial China - Chinese opera, actors and entertainers, migration, native-place networks
  • GUTFREUND, ZEVI MOSES - zevi.gutfreund@ucla.edu (AB in History, Harvard University, 2001) Subfield: United States, American West - School Desegregation in California, Liberalism in the 1960s, the American West
  • HABER, MAYA - haberm@ucla.edu (Ph.D - University of California Los Angeles Department of History, expected June 2012 MA - University of California Los Angeles Department of History, 2009 School of History, Classics and Archaeology, Birkbeck College, University of London BA - History and Philosophy, Tel Aviv University, Israel, 1997 ) Subfield: Russia, Science, agrarian history, European cultural and Intellectual history and Critical Theory - My dissertation, ?Socialist Realist Science: Constructing Knowledge about Rural Life in the Soviet Union, 1943-1958,? examines the contentious pairing of utopianism and scientific practice in the birth of a new social scientific methodology of rural life in postwar Russia. Serving as administrative and policy advisers to the state, social scientists endeavored to unveil the social problems vexing the Soviet countryside through scientific observation, experimentation, cost-benefit analysis, and statistical surveys. Yet, the utopian undercurrents of the Soviet worldview served as prisms refracting the selection, categorization, and narration of research objects. Moreover, Party intervention, ideological conformity, and professional creed constrained social scientists? scholarship. The result was a methodology which discarded social conflict and exemplified the rational unfolding of socialism. Yet through a measure of irony and cunning, revelation and disguise social scientists created a critical space for an engagement with social realities. The work interrogates the development of social scientists? professional ethics and scholarly mission, the influence of socialist realist aesthetics on scientific discourse, and the imposition of scientific rationalism on rural life in the work of economists, ethnographers, hygienists, and statisticians. The dissertation shows that social scientists became important players in postwar Soviet agricultural policy by constructing knowledge that contributed to the production of socialism as an aesthetic and epistemological system.
  • HARRIS, CAROLINE BUNNELL - cbunnell@ucla.edu (C.Phil. U.S. History, UCLA, 2011; M.A. U.S. History, UCLA, 2010; B.A. History, Occidental College, 2008) Subfield: American West, African American History, History of Religion - My dissertation seeks to uncover the meaning of interracial worship at the Azusa Street Revival and its subsequent fading from Pentecostal practice by the second decade of the twentieth century. Charting the migrations of the revival's participants, from the Midwest and South to Los Angeles beginning in the 1880s, I argue that an understanding of the racial landscapes of Los Angeles, as well as currents of religious thought from earlier revival moments in American history, will aid our understanding of Pentecostalism’s nascent growth in Southern California. The imagined meanings of religion and race worked in tandem to not just foster the development of early Pentecostalism, but also cut short its socially transgressive practices.
  • HECKMAN, ALMA RACHEL - almaheckman@ucla.edu (BA Wellesley College, Middle Eastern Studies and French, 2009; MA UCLA 2012; CPhil UCLA 2012.) Subfield: Modern Jewish and Middle Eastern History; Maghreb.
  • HERNANDEZ, CARLOS ARMANDO - carlosh@ucla.edu (C.Phil, 2012 M.A., History, UCLA 2011 M.A., Latin American Studies, UCLA 2009 B.A. History, UCLA 1993 ) Subfield: Latin America and Globalization, 1492-1830; U. S. - Mexico Borderland History and Public Policy, 20th century; Mexican Forced Migration; Latin America and the Cold War. - Dissertation title: "Narco-mundo: How Narcotraficantes Gained Control of Northern Mexico, 1945-1985." The impact of narco-violence on Mexican immigrant claims for immigration relief; U. S. - Mexico Borderland History; History of Social Movements; Peasant Movements and Political Violence in Rural Mexico; Gender and Ethnicity in 20th Century Rural Mexico; Cultural History.
  • HERR, JOSHUA - jherr@ucla.edu (Wheaton College (Wheaton, IL), BA, History and Philosophy, 2003; University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, MA, East Asian Languages and Cultures, 2007) Subfield: Ming, Qing China; Vietnam
  • HOLT, R. JOSEPH - rjholt@ucla.edu (C. Phil., UCLA, 2009; A.M., History, Stanford University, 2001; MALS (Liberal Studies), Reed College, 1996; A.B., History, University of California, Davis, 1993) Subfield: Early Modern and Modern Europe; Intellectual and Cultural - 17th-19th centuries; Enlightenment, esp. in Scotland and Germany; history of the human sciences; travel narrative, exploration, and cross-cultural encounters; comparative empire; global history; political thought; history of philosophy; and, theories of the self. Dissertation: globalization, empire, and Enlightenment anthropological thought.
  • KING, LINDSAY A - lindsayking@ucla.edu (MA, Jewish Civilization, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 2011; BA, International Relations, University of Pennsylvania, 2009) Subfield: Modern European Jewish History
  • KISO, MICHELLE MASAYE - michellekiso@ucla.edu (B.A. in History and Latin American Studies, Humboldt State University (2011, magna cum laude) Minors in: Anthropology, Geography, Linguistics, Philosophy and Spanish.) Subfield: Modern Latin America; Brazil; Environmental History
  • KOVALESKY, BRIAN ROBERT - briankov@ucla.edu (MA, U.S. History, Cal State Northridge (2008); BA, Journalism, Cal State Northridge (2001)) Subfield: 20th Century U.S.; Southern California; History of Education
  • LEISURE, JOHN LYMAN - leisure@ucla.edu (Ph.D. History) Subfield: Modern Japan - Researching the emergence of middle class consumer households in postwar Japan using danchi apartment complexes as a site of social change. (B.A. History, University of Southern California; B.A. Political Science, University of Southern California; M.A. Regional Studies East Asia, Columbia University; Fulbright Fellow, Japan)
  • LEVY, DAVID ADAM - dalevy@ucla.edu (C. Phil., October 2004; MA in European History, UCLA, January 2004; BA in Intellectual History, University of Pennsylvania, June 2001) Subfield: Modern Europe, Germany, Cultural and Intellectual History, Musicology - Thesis Topic: "Scandal Concerts and the Politicization of Opera Reception in Weimar Berlin"
  • LEWIS, PAULINE LUCY - plucylew@ucla.edu (B.A. in History and Arabic Studies, University of Michigan ) Subfield: Modern Middle East - Late Ottoman Empire; Science, Technology, and Infrastructure
  • LITKEI, JÓZSEF - litkei@ucla.edu (C. Phil. in History, UCLA 2006; MA in Central Eastern European History, Central European University 1999; BA/MA in History, E�tv�s Lor�nd University 1997) Subfield: Modern European history, History of Central Eastern Europe, History of memory, nationalism and communism - Dissertation topic: History politics and public historical thinking in Hungary, 1945-1956
  • LIU, CHIEN-LING - chienlingliu@ucla.edu (Ph.D. Candidate in Modern European History, UCLA, since 2012; B. A. in History, National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan, 1998; M. A. in History, National Taiwan University, Taiwan, 2002; M. A. in History, UCLA, 2011) Subfield: European Medicine in China, History of Medicine
  • LIVIE, KYLE MITCHELL - klivie@ucla.edu (Bachelor of Arts in History with a minor in English, University of California, Berkeley Masters of Arts in History, San Francisco State University Ph.D. in History, University of California, Los Angeles ) Subfield: Rural America, Urban/Metropolitan History, California and the American West, Cultural Geography, Community Studies, Modern American Intellectual History, Economic History, and Popular Culture - Dissertation: "Wide Open Spaces: Rural Communities and the Making of Metropolitan California, 1870-1940"
  • LUCE, CAROLINE ELIZABETH - carolineluce@ucla.edu (PhD, U.S. History, UCLA 2013; M.A. U.S. History, UCLA 2009, B.A. Wesleyan University, 2004) Subfield: 20th Century American History, American Jewish History, Labor and Working-Class History, History of Los Angeles - Dissertation explores the transformation of the American Jewish community from 1920 to 1950 by focusing on the history of the Jewish Bakers? Union of Los Angeles and its place within the Jewish labor movement and Yiddishe kultur of the multiethnic, immigrant neighborhood of Boyle Heights.
  • LUCKETT, MATTHEW S - luckettm@ucla.edu (Ph.D., History, UCLA (2014); M.A., History, Marquette (2005); B.A., History, Southeast Missouri State University (2003).) Subfield: US History, Nineteenth-Century American West
  • LYNCH, DANIEL BRENDAN - daniellynch@ucla.edu (C. Phil. US History, UCLA M.A. World History & Single Subject Teaching Credential, CSU Long Beach B.A. History, UC Berkeley) Subfield: United States, North American West, Borderlands, California - My dissertation focuses on the convergence of male Southerners and Californios in greater Los Angeles from the start of the Mexican American War through the Civil War Era. The United States defeated both Mexico and the Confederacy within twenty years, expanding national power in the West while confirming it in the South. In the far corner of the Southwest, two influential groups of men worked together to mediate Southern California's incorporation into the Union: migrants from the antebellum South and the local rancheros of Alta California. Guided by similar seigniorial ideals regarding masculine honor, land ownership and social order, Southerners and Californios joined forces in a political faction known as the Chivalry. They pushed for territorial separation from the rest of the state; coordinated vigilante activity; and forged hybrid hierarchies of race, class and gender in a complex multiethnic society. Their experience illustrates some of the possibilities of intercultural cooperation in a dynamic period of imperial expansion, sectional conflict and national reconstruction.
  • MARKMAN, KRISTINA - kmarkman@ucla.edu (C. Phil, Medieval History, UCLA (2011) M.A., Medieval History, UCLA (2010) B.A., History, UCSD (2007) B.A., Philosophy, UCSD (2007) ) Dissertation: Between Two Worlds: A Comparative Study of the Representation of Pagan Lithuania in Late Medieval German and Russian Chronicles
  • MASKARINEC, MAYA - mmaskarinec@ucla.edu Subfield: Early Middle Ages, Rome - PhD (expected March 2015). Dissertation: "Building Rome Saint by Saint. Sanctity from abroad at home in the city (6th-9th c.)"
  • MCBRIDE, JARED - mcbridejg (at) ucla.edu Subfield: History of the Soviet Union; Modern Eastern Europen History - Social history of the Second World War in the regions of Volhynia and Polissia, Ukraine; secondary interests: history and memory; archival practice; the Holocaust; war crimes trials and prosecution; the early Cold War.
  • MCCORMICK, KELLY MIDORI - kelly.midorim@gmail.com (History Ph.D.) Kelly McCormick is a second year doctoral student in modern Japanese history. Her research focuses on photography magazines and books, and cameras in 1930s to 1960s Japan. She is interested in amateur photography culture, changes in perception brought on by cameras, and the international rise of Japanese camera companies in the postwar period. Before coming to UCLA, she received her BA from UC Santa Cruz (2008) in History and Studio Art and completed an MA in East Asian Languages and Cultures at Columbia (2012). In the time between, she spent time living in Kagoshima, Japan, and has since returned to Japan as often as she can.
  • MCCUTCHEN, DEVIN SHANE - devinmccutchen@ucla.edu (C.Phil. U.S. History. University of California, Los Angeles. 2013. M.A. U.S. History. University of California, Los Angeles. 2012. B.A. History Major and Music Minor. University of California, Berkeley. 2008.) Subfield: California, Cultural, Urban, Western US, Public History - My research focuses on the connections between spatial justice and civic memory in San Francisco from the 1940s through the 1970s. In particular, I focus on the transition to a tourism economy, the effects of urban redevelopment and gentrification, contests over highrise and freeway construction, and the rise of historic preservation efforts. Furthermore, I attempt to tie these changes to the new lucrative, historically-themed civic identity for San Francisco invented in the post-war decades. Additionally, I am also interested in American musical traditions and the use of music as historical documents.
  • MERCADO, JUAN PABLO - jpmercado@ucla.edu (MA Mexican American Studies, San Jos� State University, 2011 BA Chicano Studies, UC Berkeley (with honors), 2006 AA Liberal Arts, Solano College (with honors), 2004) Subfield: Twentieth-Century United States; Chicana/o History - California & WWII Oral history Labor history
  • MOLCHADSKY , NADAV G. - nadavm@ucla.edu (PhD Candidate in Modern Jewish History; M.A. Jewish History, UCLA, 2010; Graduate Studies, Jewish History, Tel-Aviv University, Israel 2003-2006; B.A, Jewish History (Magna Cum Laude) and Political Science, Tel-Aviv University, 2002. ) Subfield: Modern Jewish History, History of Zionism and the State of Israel, History of Jewish and Zionist Historiography. - I find particular interest in public history and the affinity between history, law and politics. My dissertation focuses on processes of memory formation and social applications of the historical discipline. To that end I explore the work of Israeli commissions of inquiry, and the affinity between their work, Israeli collective memory and historiography. The topic opens a vista into a variety of ways in which a democratic society such as the one that exists in Israel has politicized and negotiated its past. Also, the study seeks to illuminate the methodological approaches and conceptual underpinnings that animate the work of professional and non-professional historians.
  • MOOREVILLE, ANAT - anatm4@ucla.edu (C.Phil. UCLA, 2012 M.A. UCLA, 2011 A.B. Brown University, 2007 ) Subfield: Sephardic/Mizrahi Jewish History, Modern Middle East, Mandate Palestine and Israel, History of Medicine and Science - My dissertation, Oculists in the Orient: Trachoma, Zionism and Global Health, investigates how the eye disease trachoma became a resilient cultural and political site in Mandate Palestine and Israel through medical practices, scientific discourses, and ethnography in the twentieth century. I trace how eye health became a conduit for Zionist social welfare practices, global Jewish medical philanthropy, and postcolonial medical diplomacy.
  • NULL, CHRISTOPHER R. - crnull@ucla.edu (M.A., US History, UCLA (2010); M.A., History, University of Alabama at Birmingham, (2008); B.A. with Honors, Philosophy, University of Alabama at Birmingham (2005); B.A., History, University of Alabama at Birmingham (2005)) Subfield: U.S. History, Legal History, 19th Century
  • OLIVAS, AARON ALEJANDRO - aaolivas@gmail.com (C.Phil History, UCLA, 2009 MA History, UCLA, 2007 MA Social Sciences, University of Chicago, 2004 BA History, University of San Francisco, 2003) Subfield: Early Modern Spain; War of the Spanish Succession (1700-1715); Colonial Latin America; Spanish political and cultural relations with France; queen consorts - My dissertation, entitled "Loyalty and Disloyalty to the Bourbon Dynasty in Spanish America and the Philippines During the War of the Spanish Succession (1700-1715)," is a study of relations between Spain, France, and their overseas empires at the turn of the eighteenth century. I examine cases of disloyalty to Philip V--- Spain's first Bourbon monarch--- found throughout the viceroyalties of New Spain and Peru, as well as European concerns about these cases. My project also deals with the role of the Compagnie Royale de Guinee in dominating Spanish imperial politics through the Asiento de Negros or slave monopoly from 1701-1713. MA Thesis: "'La esteril reina': Barbara de Braganza and the Dilemma of the Early Modern Queen Consort" (University of Chicago, 2004) Honors Thesis: "'La Parmesana': Historical Perspectives on the Life of Queen Isabella Farnese of Spain, 1714-1746" (University of San Francisco, 2003) Research Assistant: "Al-Andalus in the Age of Enlightenment: Islamic Art and Culture in the Spanish Imagination, 1750-1820" (Getty Research Institute, 2009) Research Assistant: "Andean and European Traces in the Construction of the Manuscripts of Fray Martin de Murua" (Getty Research Institute, 2007) Research Assistant: "Faith and Beauty: Chinese and Filipino Art and the Aesthetics of Conversion in the California Missions" (Getty Research Institute, 2006-2007)
  • OSEI-OPARE, K.N. - oseiopare@ucla.edu (M.A., History, Stanford University, 2011; A.B. with Honors, History, Stanford University, 2011) Subfield: Intellectual African History, Nkrumaism, State Capitalism, Modernization, Soviet Influences upon Africa and African influences upon the Soviet Union, African philosophy, Intellectual Networks
  • PARKER, CAITLIN ANNE - caitlinparker@ucla.edu (C. Phil; MA US History, UCLA, 2010; BA History and French, Amherst College, 2006) Subfield: 20th Century US; urban; political; spatial; race and ethnicity - Dissertation working title: "Mayor Bradley's Los Angeles: Urban Governance in an Era of Austerity, 1973-1993"
  • PERRY, DANIELLA G. - dgperry@ucla.edu (Doctoral Candidate C.Phil, UCLA History MA, UCLA History BS, UCLA Physiological Science ) Subfield: History of Science, Medicine and Technology in the 20th Century; heredity, clinical genetics & race/urban history - The argument that violent visual media is responsible for crime and violence has persisted since the 1940s, attracting repeated federal investigations in the United States. However, few historical studies have considered the psychological research that informs public debate. For my dissertation, The Role of Scientific Research in Media Violence Investigations, 1954-2012, I investigate how violent media shape scientific research on human aggression and the concomitant role violent media research plays in investigative hearings on the incidence of social violence. My preliminary findings suggest that contemporary debate about whether media violence causes real-world violence stems in part from how scientific research has been communicated since the 1960s. The questions addressed in my dissertation are: 1) What role has media violence research played in legislative debate, and 2) how do legislative hearings affect the development of media violence research? I use a constructionist approach that media violence is characterized as a problem by social and scientific discourse; this approach makes no claims about the objective reality of the problem. A historical reading of this as a scientific controversy acknowledges experts as primary actors in the dispute that have a role in public understanding of the problem. Identifying the difficulties in building a consensus from conflicting claims between experts is critical in addressing the political claims made by legislators. Evidence is derived from scientific studies, newspapers, newsletters, interviews, and archival records.
  • PETROU, MARISSA HELENE - mpetrou@ucla.edu (CPhil History, UCLA 2010, MA History, UCLA 2009, BA History with Minor in German, Northwestern University 2005.) Subfield: History of Science, Medicine and Technology - Science museums, history of anthropology, German history of science in the Kaiserreich, visual culture of science and scientific publications.
  • POWERS, ANNE BEVERLY - anniepowers@ucla.edu (BA, History, UC Berkeley (2011)) Subfield: 19th century United States; public history; material culture and iconography
  • PRIPAS-KAPIT, SARAH ROSS - srpripas@ucla.edu (M.A. History, UCLA 2012; B.A. History, Scripps College 2009) Subfield: United States history, history of women/gender, history of medicine, U.S. in the world - My dissertation is about international students who studied at the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania from approximately 1880-1915, focusing particularly on students who came from various parts of Asia (India, China, the Philippines).
  • REDFORD, LAURA - laura.redford@ucla.edu (MA in American Studies Columbia University 2006, BA Humanities Brigham Young University 2000.) Subfield: US History, 20th Century Urban History - I am interested in the development of cities, and more specifically the history of residential segregation, its causes and implications.
  • REILLY, BRANDON JOSEPH - breilly@ucla.edu (C.Phil. in Southeast Asian History, 2010 [UCLA]; MA in History, 2009 [UCLA]; MA in History, 2006 [CSUF]; BA in History, minors in French + Spanish, 2004 [CSUF] ) Subfield: Southeast Asia, Philippines, Nationalism and Culture, Comparative Literature - Regionally: Philippine, modern Southeast Asian, Spanish and American imperial, Latin American. Topically: oral traditions, orality and literacy, nationalism, comparative history of empire and colonialism, forms of literature, literary canons, race, gender, sexuality.
  • RENTON, KATHRYN ELIZABETH - kathrynrenton@ucla.edu (B.A. History and Literature, Harvard University 2005; M.A. History, UCLA 2013) Subfield: Intellectual & Cultural History of Europe; Early modern Spain; Early modern France; History of Science
  • ROSENFELD, SUSAN ALEXANDRA COREY - susanrosenfeld@ucla.edu (M.A. New York University, 2009 B.A. UC Santa Barbara, 2006) Subfield: African History; History of the African Diaspora; Yoruba History; History of Afro-Brazilian returnees - Trans-Atlantic slave trade; West African history; mythology and folklore; Afro-Brazilian returnees; Afro-Caribbean intellectual and cultural production and radicalism; Pan-Africanism; and Yoruba systems of divination. I am also working as a research assistant for the Marcus Garvey and UNIA Papers Project under Professor Robert Hill.
  • ROTH, CASSIA - cassiaroth@ucla.edu (C. Phil (2011), UCLA; M.A. (2011), UCLA, History; B.A. (2008), Bowdoin College (Phi Beta Kappa, Magna cum Laude), Latin American Studies (Honors) and Spanish) Subfield: Modern Latin America; Brazil; Women and Gender Studies; Atlantic World - My research focuses on the history of law, medicine, and gender in turn-of-the-century Rio de Janeiro. I investigate women's practices and customs surrounding childbirth, abortion, and infanticide as well as the legal and medical responses.
  • RUBY, TWYLA E. - truby@ucla.edu (B.A., Barnard College, 2008) Subfield: History of science and medicine in early modern Europe, visual and material culture
  • SADLER, JESSE - jsadler@ucla.edu (M.A. UCLA, 2008 B.A. History and Political Science UCSD, 2005) Subfield: Dutch History, Early Modern Europe, Cultural and Intellectual History - Dissertation title: Family in Revolt: The Van der Meulen and Della Faille Families in the Dutch Revolt Political and religious identity in the Dutch Revolt, family history, Reformation, Political culture, Mercantile history, history of the self
  • SCHWINN, PAUL ANTHONY - pschwinn@ucla.edu (BA History- Wisconsin 04, MA Education- Johns Hopkins 06, MA History- UCLA 08) Subfield: United States, The American West, Men and Masculinity - Research- The intersection of Masculinity and the imagined West in American culture from the Civil War to the Progressive Era
  • SERRANO, FERNANDO - fernandoserrano@ucla.edu (Ph.D. in History, UCLA, in progress. M.A. in Latin American Studies, SDSU, 2010. B.A. in Philosophy, French Minor, SDSU, 2005.) Subfield: Latin American History; Ethnohistory; Colonial Mexican History; Michoacán and Guanajuato - In my research I consider the impact of silver mining in colonial Guanajuato on the indigenous cummunities that provided the labor force for the mines. In particular, I consider the participation of workers from Purépecha communities in Michoacan.
  • SERRANO NÁJERA, JOSÉ LUIS - serranoj@ucla.edu (C.Phil. History, UCLA, March 2011 M.A. U.S. History, UCLA, December 2010 M.A. Interdisciplinary Studies, CSUDH, May 2008 B.A. History & Chicana/o Studies, UCLA, June 2005) Subfield: Chicana/o History, Indigeneity, Cultural Studies, Oral History, 20th Century U.S. History, Modern Mexican History - The U.S. and México have a history where Indigenous race and ethnicity have resulted in discrimination and violation of civil and human rights, while paradoxically Indigenous heritage is mythologized. Indigenous Peoples’ social movements challenge this paradox by addressing the right to autonomously define cultural trajectory and demand respect for human rights. My research provides needed attention to these movements in the U.S. and México. I focus on Chicana/o activists and cultural groups that utilized and developed an Indigenist ideology to advocate for respect of human rights across borders since the 1960s. I question how these groups contribute to the prominence of contemporary Indigenismo or Indigenism as a cultural and political ideology among Mexican Americans. My preliminary findings suggest Chicana/o Indigenist activists, informed by trans-border interactions, cultural practices, and long oral traditions challenged hegemonic constraints of Indigeneity constructed by Mexican and U.S. assimilationist projects. My study thus provides important insight on the historic human rights implications of cultural Indigeneity in a complex culturally diverse world. My research project provides a study of Mexican American participation with and in Indigenous Peoples’ social movements. I analyze the development of cultural ideology beyond the parameters of a focus on United States civil rights struggles as represented by the prospects of the Chicana/o Movement and consequent public advocacies. My historical narrative emphasizes the significance of Indigenous Peoples’ transnational social movements so that scholars assimilate how international communications of inherent human rights can inform necessary reforms across borders in the U.S. and México. My study is academically timely and useful because it contributes to debates regarding the significance of cultural rights and identity to human rights. My historically focused analysis provides insight on ways to intervene on conditions of racism, human rights violations, and poverty Indigenous Peoples, Chicanas, and Chicanos face in the U.S., México, and across the Americas. My intervention also provides further understanding on the integral role consciousness and utilization of historicity and cultural identity has on communities’ political, social, and economic well being that is free of injustice.
  • SETIYAWAN, DAHLIA GRATIA - dsetiyawan@ucla.edu (Ph.D. Candidate in Southeast Asian History. M.A., History, UCLA, 2008; M.S.Ed., Intercultural Communication, University of Pennsylvania, 2005; B.A., History, University of Pennsylvania, 2000 ) Subfield: Modern Indonesia, Asian American history, oral history, U.S. in the World - Master's Thesis: "Unity in Diversity: Identity Development and Community-Building among Indonesian Immigrants in Philadelphia"
  • SHAH, SAMEER JAY - samjshah@ucla.edu (B.A.: MIT 2003 in Mathematics and STS [Science, Technology, and Society] M.A.: UCLA 2005 in History) Subfield: 20th century American history; American science; Modern science
  • SIERRA SILVA, PABLO MIGUEL - sierrapm@ucla.edu (C. Phil. 2009, UCLA; M.A. 2008, UCLA - Latin American History; B.A. 2006, University of Pennsylvania - Latin American Studies, World History.) Subfield: Colonial Mexico, African Presence in Mexico and Latin America, Marriage Patterns in Colonial Urban Centers - 16th and 17th century focus on urban centers in Central Mexico, primarily Puebla de los Angeles and Mexico City. Intermarriage between African, Asian, and Indigenous workers in labor-intensive textile mills.
  • SLAUGHTER, MICHAEL ANTHONY - ma_slaughter@sbcglobal.net (Ph.D. UCLA; M.A., History UCLA; M.A., History Cal State LA; B.A., History Eastern Illinois Univ. ) Subfield: History of Los Angeles/Urban West; African American History - Dissertation uses Los Angeles'Jefferson High School as a lens to view the historical forces that impinged on the lives of residents of the community of Central Avenue between 1930 and 1980.
  • SPIKES, COURTNEY - cspikes@ucla.edu PhD Candidate. Dissertion (in progress): Shipwrecks, Murderers and Piqueurs: State Authority and Political Culture during the French Restoration (1815-1830). Chair: Lynn Hunt.
  • STEVENS, JEFFREY ALLEN - jf.stevens@ucla.edu (Ph.D. Candidate in Ancient History. C.Phil., History, UCLA 2011; M.A., History, UCLA, 2009; M.A., Ancient History, University of Oregon 2007; B.A., History, University of Oregon, 2005; B.A., Economics and Government, Claremont McKenna College, 1993 ) Subfield: Roman History, Greek History, Classical Archaeology, Late Antiquity - Dissertation Title: Staring into the Face of Roman Power: Resistance and Assimilation from behind the Mask of Infamia (Chair: Ronald Mellor). Assistant Field Director, San Martino Archaeological Field School (RI), Torano di Borgorose, Italy (University of Rochester site affiliation)
  • TAJIRYAN, SONA - stajiryan@ucla.edu (BA, Yerevan State University (2009), MA, Yerevan State University (2011) (Armenia)) Subfield: Armenian Studies - Early Modern Trade Network of Julfa Armenians
  • VIVANCO, PABLO HENRI - pablovivanco2002@yahoo.com (C. Phil, UCLA 2005; M.A. (2000) in German and Jewish Studies, Ruprecht-Karls-University Heidelberg) Subfield: Jewish Religion, society and culture in 18th and 19th century Germany, History of Jewish Historiography, History of the Third Reich, Austrian politics and culture - Dissertation (work-titel): Jewish liberalism and its critics in early 20th century Vienna (a study in the political cultures of the middle classes in Vienna and the response of the literary avant-Garde)
  • WATERS, LESLIE M. - leslie.waters@fulbrightmail.org (C.Phil (European History), UCLA 2009; MA (European History), UCLA 2008; BA (History), University of San Francisco 2003) Subfield: Central and Eastern Europe, Modern Europe, Social and Economic History, Minorities and Borderlands - My dissertation, "Resurrecting the Nation: Felvidék and the Hungarian Territorial Revisionist Project" focuses on border revision between Hungary and Czechoslovakia during the Second World War and its impact on identity politics and the ideology of nationalism in East-Central Europe.
  • WEISE, CONSTANZE - coweise@gmail.com (C. Phil (UCLA 2007): African History M.A. African History, Ancient History, Anthropology, 1998: University of Bayreuth (Germany) ) Subfield: West Africa, Precolonial and Colonial Africa, Pre-Modern Near East, World History/ Black Atlantic - Pre-19th century West Africa, Nigeria; Nupe-Yoruba relationship; Oral Tradition, Oral History, Memory, Rituals, Historical Linguistics Fieldwork: March 2000-October 2000 in Nigeria among the Nupe, Yoruba and Hausa
  • WOODHOUSE MOWL, ADAM JOSEPH - adam.mowl@ucla.edu (BA in Ancient & Modern History, Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford (2008) ; MA in Intellectual History and the History of Political Thought, University of London (2009)) Subfield: Medieval ; European Intellectual History - Humanist Scholarship and Imperial Thinking in Renaissance Italy
  • YILDIZ, MURAT CIHAN - muratcihanyildiz@gmail.com (M.A. History, UCLA, 2009; B.A. magna cum laude History & Political Science, UCSD, 2005) Subfield: Modern Middle Eastern History & Ottoman History - My dissertation, “Strengthening Male Bodies and Building Robust Communities: Physical Culture in the Late Ottoman Empire,” presents an alternative approach to conceptualizing the late Ottoman Empire as well as the empire’s different ethno-religious communities by investigating late-nineteenth and early-twentieth-century cultural, social, and political transformations in Istanbul across sectarian divisions. This project explores the emergence of a shared Ottoman sports culture among upper and middle-class Muslims, Christians, and Jews of Istanbul.
  • ZALDIVAR, ANTONIO M. - (M.A. Medieval History, Western Michigan University, 2005; B.A. History and Political Science, Florida State University, 2002) Subfield: Medieval - I am primarily interested in the medieval Crown of Aragon and the western Mediterranean. My Dissertation, titled “Language and Power in the Medieval Crown of Aragon: The Rise of Vernacular Writing and Codeswitching Strategies in the Thirteenth-Century Royal Chancery,” systematically analyzes what drove the thirteenth-century kings of the Crown of Aragon to begin writing in their realms’ spoken vernaculars (Catalan and Aragonese), what these motivations reveal about contemporary mentalities and language ideologies, and how codeswitching (shifting from Latin to the romance and back) figured into the crown’s overall governing practices My minor fields include: early medieval history; medieval Catalan literature; the early-modern Mediterranean; and colonial Latin American history.
  • ZARO, AMY - azaro@ucla.edu (M.A., History, UCLA (2006) J.D., UCLA (2002) B.A., History, Boston College (1998) ) Subfield: Modern Germany, European legal history - The reconstruction of the postwar German legal system in the American zone of occupation

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