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Fall 2021 Colloquium Schedule

Announcing the 2021 UCLA Fall Quarter History of Science, Medicine and Technology Colloquium. All meetings will take place 4pm-5pm PST Mondays on Zoom (RSVP required). Links to RSVP for each Zoom meeting will be sent out closer to the relevant meeting dates. Everyone is welcome!

October 18, 5 pm Mario Biagioli (UCLA Law and Information Studies) “From Anti Science to Science Mimicry: Inventing Ethics in Trump's EPA.”

(please note the later time)

  • This paper moves from the recent findings of agnotologists (like the book Merchants of Doubt) about the post-WWII strategy by tobacco and oil companies to cast doubt about the scientific evidence concerning, respectively, the risks of tobacco smoking and the existence of global warming. I argue that a new chapter of that strategy book was recently articulated in Trump's EPA. This is a strategy that does not hinge on the production of doubt about the content of scientific knowledge but rather targets and transforms some of the key ethical norms of science (openness, transparency, and impartiality), effectively turning them against themselves.
  • For remote participants: Please click here to register and receive a Zoom link

  • For those joining us on campus, RSVP and symptom monitoring is required. Please be prepared to show your clearance status when entering the seminar room. Please RSVP using this form if you will be attending in person

  • For visitors coming from other institutions, please remember that UCLA has a vaccine mandate and that everyone coming to campus needs to fill out the daily symptom monitoring form which can be found here: https://uclasurveys.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3qRLtouCYKzBbH7

Nov 1 Chris Willoughby (Huntington Library)  "Collected without Consent: Imperialism and Enslavement in Harvard’s Medical Museum."

Co-sponsored with the Atlantic field

Nov 29 Iris Clever (University of Chicago) "The Afterlives of Skulls: How Race Science Became a Data Science."

Spring 2021 Colloquium Schedule

Announcing the 2021 UCLA Spring Quarter History of Science, Medicine and Technology Colloquium. All meetings will take place 4pm-5pm PST Mondays on Zoom (RSVP required). Links to RSVP for each Zoom meeting will be sent out closer to the relevant meeting dates. Everyone is welcome!

April 5 Megan Rosenbloom (UCLA), “Anatomized Bodies at Work: The Human Skin Book and its Implications for the Histories of Medicine and the Book.”

April 19 Gideon Manning (Cedars-Sinai), “False Images Do Not Lie: Medicine, Editors’ Decisions, and the Case of René Descartes’s Treatise on Man.”

  • How to discuss the role of illustrations in the early modern period in a way that is responsive to the concepts and vocabulary of the time remains elusive.  In this talk, which builds from the medical tradition outward, I will suggest that the technical language of historia-actio-usus (history-action-use), which originates in Aristotle and Galen and is then standardized among anatomists in the sixteenth and seventeenth century, provides us what has been missing.  I will specifically consider the case of René Descartes’s posthumously published Treatise on Man, which appeared in Latin translation in 1662 and then in French in 1664.  The original manuscript of the Treatise contained perhaps one or two images, but the text called for many more.  Accordingly, the editors had to make numerous decisions.  I will demonstrate how the language of historia-actio-usus, which Descartes also used, allows us to better understand the editors’ decisions and the many differences between the illustrations in the 1662 and 1664 editions of same text.
  • Zoom RSVP Link

May 10 Jacy Young (Quest University): “Psychology, Questionnaires, and the Morass of ‘Big’ Data.”

May 17 Bharat Venkat (UCLA) “At the Limits of Cure.”

What does it mean to be cured, and what does it mean for a cure to come undone? This talk draws from my forthcoming book At the Limits of Cure (Duke University Press, fall 2021), which focuses on the history and present of tuberculosis treatment in India. Drawing on ethnographic and historical materials, as well as film, fiction, and folklore, I examine cure in its various iterations—from sanatoriums and gold therapy to travel and antibiotics—as well as how such cures come up against their limits. Through an anthropological history, this book explores a range of curative imaginations that have taken form around tuberculosis: in debates contrasting idyllic sanatoriums and crowded prisons, through which freedom in its many forms became envisioned as a kind of therapy; in the itineraries of ships filled with coolies and soldiers seeking
work and treatment across the British empire; in the networks of scientists who tested antibiotics in India as a means of asking whether poverty really mattered to therapeutic success; in clinics  where patients were told that they were cured only to undergo treatment again and again; and in the reworking of midcentury anxieties about population growth in relation to contemporary drug resistance in India’s urban centers. A central contention of this book--and my talk--is that our
imagination of cure shapes our understanding of time: not only the temporality underlying histories of science and medicine, but also, the temporality of therapy itself.

May 24 Erika Milam (Princeton) “Afterlives in Nature: Long-term Ecological Research in the Age of COVID.”

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Winter 2021 Colloquium Schedule

Announcing the 2021 UCLA Winter Quarter History of Science, Medicine and Technology Colloquium. All meetings will take place 4pm-5pm PST Mondays on Zoom (RSVP required). Links to RSVP for each Zoom meeting will be sent out closer to the relevant meeting dates. Everyone is welcome!

Jan 11 Grace Kim (Vanderbilt), “Preserving Art, Producing Science: The Microbiological Lives of Cultural Heritage.”

Jan 25 Philip Lehmann (UCR), “Polish Steppes and German Gardens: Climate Amelioration in the Generalplan Ost.”

Feb 8 Hippolyte Goux (UCLA), "Representation and Abstraction: Economic Models and the End of Man."

Feb 22 Roundtable Past and Futures: Current Challenges in the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine 

            with interventions by:

                 Terence Keel (UCLA), “The Demographic Future of the History of Science.”

                 Cathy Gere (UCSD), "The Climate Crisis and Professional Equity in History of Science."

March 8 Preston McBride (Dartmouth), "Lethal Education: Native American Boarding Schools, 1879-1934."

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Fall 2020 Colloquium Schedule

We will meet on zoom from 4-5 pm. RSVP links will be circulated with the announcements for the individual talks.


Nov 2
Ted Porter (UCLA) "Democracy Counts: On Sacred and Debased Numbers"
Comments by Amir Alexander (UCLA)
Co-sponsored by the UCLA Luskin Center for History and Policy


Nov 16
Book Event: Presentation and celebration of Soraya de Chadarevian, Heredity under the Microscope: Chromosomes and the Study of the Human Genome (University of Chicago Press, 2020)
Discussants: Ted Porter (UCLA) and Iris Clever (University of Chicago)


Nov 23
Taylor Moore (UCSB): "Tracing the Magical Rhinoceros Horn in Egypt: A Decolonial Materialist History"
Co-sponsored by the European History Colloquium

Regristration: https://ucla.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYsdeGurzIqGtxldiJYGsO0ROwIFjd72WeD 


Nov 30
Claire Gherini (Cedars-Sinai Postdoctoral Fellow), "Slavery's Medicine: Making Medical Knowledge from the Garrison to the Plantation in the British Caribbean, 1763-1807"

Registration: https://ucla.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMldumtpz0sEtPww5ISb-MGdBajvEwO8SZP


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Winter 2020 Colloquium Schedule

All talks are held in Bunche 5288 at 4pm unless otherwise noted.

 

February 3:   Lukas Rieppel, Brown University.

“Assembling the Dinosaur”

February 24No Colloquium TodayInstead: History Department Talk by Glenn Penny, University of Iowa and Candidate for Bruman Chair in German History. 

“Unbinding German History”

(Philipp Lehmann, UC Riverside, postponed to Spring 2020 - “Polish Steppes and German Gardens: Climate Amelioration in the Generalplan Ost”)

March 2:   Aro Velmet, University of Southern California

“Pasteur’s Empire: Bacteriology and Politics in France, Its Colonies, and the World”

March 9:   Otniel Dror, Hebrew University and UCLA Institute for Society and Genetics

"Supra-Maximal Super-Pleasure"

March 16: Deborah Coen, Yale University

“Climate Change and the Enigma of Usable Knowledge”

 

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Fall 2019 Colloquium Schedule

All talks are held in Bunche 5288 at 4pm unless otherwise noted.

 

October 21: Sari Siegel, Cedars Sinai Program in History of Medicine and UCLA

“The Recruitment and Activities of Jewish Prisoner-Physicians During the Holocaust”

 

November 4: John Krige, Georgia Institute of Technology and Caltech

“Some Challenges of Writing Transnational History of Science and Technology”

 

Saturday, November 9: 2019 UC SoCal History of Science Graduate Seminar

BUNCHE 6275, HISTORY DEPT CONFERENCE ROOM

 

November 18:  Scottie Buehler, UCLA

“Religion and Ecclesiastical Practices of Midwifery Education in Eighteenth-century France”

 

November 25: Vivien Hamilton, Harvey Mudd College

“Competing Virtues of Measurement: Physics, Medicine and Quantification in Early X-ray Therapy”